Posts Tagged ‘Wild Georgia Shrimp’

“SHRIMPIN’ EXCURSIONS ABOARD LADY JANE”

Friday, April 26th, 2013

Lady Jane Shrimp BoatCaptain Larry Credle provides the brains and education to one and all aboard “Lady Jane”.  This U.S. Coast Guard certified 49 passenger steel shrimping vessel was recently retired after years of loyal service to the shrimping industry.

The ‘Lady,’ after being refurbished and brought back to life, now offers guests a cruising experience they have never known. While there, you can truly get into the core world of shrimping. Help the knowledgeable and engaging crew of marine biologists sort the shrimp from “Lady Jane’s” catch. Sit back and enjoy the meal of boiled shrimp that First Mate John Tyre prepares just for you.

The cruise remains in the beautifully protected waters of St. Simon Sound. And “Lady Jane” has it all at your disposal; from an air conditioned cabin and restroom to large open decks where you can walk around and enjoy the breathtaking views. This is, quite literally, paradise on earth.

Georgia Shrimp BoatAdventure, fun, education – all mixed with ‘5-star’ services – is what you receive when you speak with Captain Larry as he helms a real Shrimp Trawler and engages you in one of the most historical industries in the world.

The stunning ambiance of St. Simon’s Island has no competition. Captain Larry has many fans on this historical and memorable location.  The staff of The King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort, tell all of their visitors that Captain Larry and the “Lady Jane” can’t be missed.

As it is with so many things on this stunning island, the King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort is also part of history. This historic Georgia Shrimping Tripocean front retreat heralds Captain Larry and his “Lady Jane” because they, too, are all about providing relaxation, inspiration and recreation – all in equal measure – and is a locale that has been beloved since its opening in 1935.

Beautiful beaches, ocean front dining and six sparkling blue pools have helped make the King & Prince the ‘go to’ destination on the Georgia coast.

Enjoy the history. Relax as you set sail on the “Lady Jane” and come ‘home’ to the stunning resort that is the King and Prince.

 

For more information on these locations, head to:

www.kingandprince.com/water-activities.aspx

The King and Prince Shines in Southern Food Festivals

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

The King and Prince culinary staff has had a busy September!  The kitchen buzzed with activity through the constant flow of fall travelers, conventions, weddings and other gatherings.  In addition, they had the pleasure of participating in two local festivals – the Shrimp and Grits Festival and the inaugural St. Simons Food & Spirits Festival.

On the Friday night of the Shrimp & Grits festival, our staff worked tirelessly to prepare one of our signature dishes for the voting masses.  Their hard work paid off when we won the People’s Choice award for Best Vendor!

On the next weekend, Chef Jeff and his team showcased several delicious treats, including Cajun Wild Georgia Shrimp Skewers on Sweet Corn Salsa, for the St. Simons Food & Spirits Festival.

This Festival, whose proceeds went to benefit  Hospice of the Golden Isles, asked our own Food & Beverage Director Vinny D’Agostino to be their master mixologist.  With the help of our talented bartenders, Vinny introduced festival goers to our signature cocktails, featuring 13th Colony Southern Corn Whisky, among others.

We can hardly wait until next year!

Tom Plant’s Culinary Adventures on St. Simons

Wednesday, September 26th, 2012

Low Country Boil at The King and Prince

Tom Plant, of WINEormous.com has written a series of blogs about his spring visit to The King and Prince and St. Simons Island.  He fit quite a few adventures into a three-day trip!

My whirlwind three day visit to Saint Simons Island this past April was drawing to a close. Part of Georgia’s wilderness coast, it’s one of 15 beachfront islands along a 90 mile stretch. We began Wednesday morning with a visit to  a local favorite for lunch and dinner, Palmer’s Village Café. This charming spot is adorned with local art on every wall and the smells are heavenly.

Read this and more of Tom’s great stories here.

 

Go Rustic at Your Wedding With Shrimp and Grits at the King and Prince

Monday, September 24th, 2012

shrimp and grits recipe

Loving the idea of a rustic wedding but don’t want to do the whole barn-haybale-kerchief thing?  Elegant-ize your event with a St. Simons Island Wedding at the King and Prince!  Shrimp and Grits are healthy, local, down-home fare – just perfect for a relaxed brunch or elegant reception.  The K&P just took the ‘People’s Choice’  prize at the at the 2012 Wild Georgia Shirmp & Grits Festival and you can try Chef Jeff Kaplan’s winning recipe below at home for a taste of success.  Then invite your guests here and share with them that perfect combination of grace, welcome and simplicity that is St. Simons Island!

SHRIMP & GRITS WITH TASSO CREAM SAUCE

2 Servings

1 cup heavy cream

3 T. olive oil

1/3 cup Tasso Ham

¼ cup Kernel Corn

¼ cup Diced Tomatoes

2 T. chopped Green Onion

½ cup Wild Georgia Shrimp

1 T. Cajun Seasoning

¼ cup Asiago Cheese

Salt & Pepper to Taste

In one saucepan, sauté the shrimp with Cajun seasoning using olive oil. In another pan, sauté the ham, corn, tomatoes and green onions. Add heavy cream and Asiago cheese; let simmer for two minutes. Add shrimp and serve over cooked stone ground grits of your choice.

The Royal Treatment

Thursday, July 5th, 2012

Diane Leone enjoyed “The Royal Treatment” on her recent visit to The King and Prince.   For Jacksonville Magazine, she writes about her experiences – from our delicious Eggs Benedict to Shrimpin’ aboard the Lady Jane – all on “island time”!

Southern Cuisine, Ocean Breezes, and History — All at The King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort on St. Simons Island
By Diane Leone

It’s almost impossible not to feel a bit like royalty while staying at The King and Prince. It’s not just the sparkling water in the sprawling pool area or the ocean breeze from the blue Atlantic just outside your room — it’s also the history of the resort, having started in 1935 as a private dance club only to become The King and Prince Hotel in 1941. And the royal feel continues as you learn the history of St. Simons and enjoy the Southern hospitality of the local residents and business owners. They are on “island time” and it won’t be long before you are, too. Soon you’ll never want to leave this paradise.

Attending the four-day “Southern Culinary Cuisine” event at The King and Prince is an amazing treat.

With the recent addition of Executive Chef Jeff Kaplan, The King and Prince has succeeded in creating an exceptional Southern Cuisine experience for its guests. Chef Kaplan embraces the “Food to Table Movement.” This was apparent from the first evening, when the menu included inventive drinks from Georgia’s 13th Colony Distillery, an amazing spread of artisan cheeses from Sweet Grass Dairy (Thomasville, GA) paired with local honeys and jams, delicious White Georgia Shrimp & Grits, melt-in-your-mouth crème brûlée with fresh Georgia peaches, and buttery Chardonnay made from the Muscadine grape (compliments of Georgia’s Still Pond Winery).

You will awake to the sound of the ocean waves hitting the beach. Don’t miss a chance to watch the sunrise over the ocean before you make your way to the culinary delight that awaits you for breakfast. One such dish is Chef Kaplan’s take on traditional eggs benedict, a delightful meal with perfectly poached eggs resting on fried green tomatoes, bacon, and goat cheese on top of English muffins.

Although you could simply      spend the day at the edge of the ocean or at the pool, basking in the sun and sampling the Southern fare, there are activities to explore on St. Simons that will help you burn some calories so you can enjoy more Southern Cuisine delights. One such option is The King and Prince Golf Course, designed by architect Joe Lee; the course is famous for a group of four spectacular signature holes delicately situated in the marsh. Watch for the eagle nest and alligators if the grand 300-year-old oaks with moss hanging lazily off their limbs are not enough to capture your attention while experiencing this beautiful golf course. If you want to see the island and hear stories of its history, take a trolley tour with Cap Fendig, whose family has resided on St. Simons since the 1800s.

To really feel the local vibe of the fresh food you are tasting, take the Let’s Go Shrimpin’ tour on the Lady Jane shrimp boat, where you’ll have the chance to touch the bounty hauled up from the water. Experience the thrill of seeing all of the different fish, sharks, shrimp, and stingrays. During our excursion, a sea turtle was caught in the nets (it’s rare for this to happen), great to see but always put back in the water. Everything caught is put back after guests get to touch, hold, and photograph the catch, except for the shrimp, because the trademark white shrimp are boiled up for guests to dine on before departing the Lady Jane.

For a truly local feel, consider Southern Soul Barbeque, a casual place with benches outside where you can smell the ribs, chicken, pulled pork and killer ‘sides’ cooking. The restaurant has nationwide appeal (featured on shows such as Diners, Drive-ins and Dives).

Don’t miss a visit to Palmer’s Village Café where you’ll find delightful locally-sourced dishes with a beautiful backdrop of local artists’ paintings. The art makes the café feel light and airy and it’s for sale if you find a piece you just have to have. Palmer’s offers up creative breakfast dishes such as a mini biscuit with café sausage and pimento cheese — a Southern tradition — or challah French toast and blueberry orange compote with warm, fresh maple syrup.

While on the island, you simply cannot afford to miss a meal at the award-winning Halyards restaurant, where Chef Dave Snyder features a “seafood demo” with 10-15 varieties of local fish. Our menu included grilled whole shrimp with salsa, sautéed flounder with caramelized vidalia crab scampi butter, oysters grilled with garlic oil and chimichurri, and much more. It’s a must-experience local eatery.

The delightful Sugar Marsh Cottage, located just 13 miles from Brunswick, offered an amazing chocolate tasting, complete with information on how to rate chocolate. This was wonderful — and yet there was more! A honey sampling from Savannah Bee Company was truly an inspiring experience. Who knew there were so many delectable types of honey?

To round out your gourmet sampling of the incredible Southern Culinary Cuisine event, find Food and Beverage Director Mr. Vinny D’Agostino to get his recipe for homemade limoncello. Not only does this Italian after-dinner liqueur aid in digestion, it’s smooth and sublime.

 

At the end of the day, The King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort, along with St. Simons Island, are worth experiencing. You’ll find yourself on island time in no time at all.

If you’d like to purchase this article for your publication, click here to contact the author directly.

Why You Should Visit St. Simons Island

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2012

Claudine Williams visited us last April.  Here’s what she has to say about her getaway on TripWolf.com

I drove through a dozen small towns to get from Atlanta  to the coast of Georgia. At first, I thought the towns were quaint pit-stops along miles and miles of road. Sometimes I’d see horses grazing on land along the two-lane highway. I kept thinking that there had to be a faster route to St. Simons Island. Couldn’t I take I-95 there? I barely saw any cars on the road as I trudged along at 45 miles per hour. I was tempted to go faster, but I knew that Georgia cops were nothing to play with.

I was to stay in the King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort. I had been grinding, putting in 16+ hour days writing, dealing with deadlines. At night, I usually fell asleep with my laptop on my bed, so I was more than ready to see what St. Simons Island and the King and Prince had to offer.

The King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort

The King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort

A Family-Friendly Island

St. Simons is a laid-back island with a family-friendly vibe. There are no high-rises on the island, just plenty of shopping centers, restaurants, homes, a couple of golf courses, parks, and the beach. Unlike most beach communities, the majority of the people there are year-round residents. When the weather’s warm, residents head to the ocean for little rest and recreation. They meet under the trees in Neptune Park, the public park. The park has a playground, miniature golf, and a  pool. It is one the top hang-out spots in St. Simons. The cute shopping and entertainment district is the other hot-spot.

 

Shopping district on St. Simons Island

Shopping district on St. Simons Island

Lucky for me, island’s popular King and Prince resort is also near the ocean. I knew that I was getting closer to the resort when I saw a  golf cart driving down road. My room was not ready when I arrived at the hotel, but the first desk personnel offered to call my cell phone when it was all set.

King and Prince Resort and Spa

View from an oceanview room at the King and Prince Resort and Spa

A few minutes later, I moved into an oceanfront room with a king-sized bed. I opened the sliding glass doors and looked out at the pool and beyond at the ocean. The view was glorious, and so was the ocean breeze.

Touring St. Simons by Trolley

My car safely parked in the resort’s free lot, I took a trolley tour of the island, a cool way to see what the island is all about. With the windows wide open and a breeze blowing, we drove under massive canopy trees that reminded me of the Old South, ladies with parasols and gloved hands. Actually, people who love history would probably enjoy the trolley tour. The tour takes visitors to points of interest like the maritime center, the old lighthouse, and Bloody Marsh Battle site, the site of a 1700s battle between the British and Spaniards.

Maritime Center on St. Simons Island

We explored the island’s history at the Maritime Center

Seafood lovers would love the plentiful seafood at the island’s many restaurants. Shrimping and fishing are popular pastimes. I rode on the Lady Jane, a shrimping boat, and I felt just like Bubba from Forest Gump. I happen to love shrimp, so I was happy to learn that the shrimping industry is alive and well in Georgia.

A shrimp net from off the Georgia Coast

We went shrimping off of the Georgia coast

 

Before lunch at Haylards Restaurant, Chef Dave Snyder showed off a recent catch.

 

One Visit and You’re Hooked

When I think of the plentiful  seafood and the peaceful living on St. Simons Island, I want to hop in my car and take another trip to the island. The next time I visit, I’ll make sure that I take the Interstate to get there faster.

Fishing on St. Simon's Island

Cap Fendig demonstrates fishing techniques.

 

St. Simons Island

The easy life on St. Simons Island in Georgia

Fiercely Proud – Saint Simons Island

Wednesday, June 6th, 2012

Wild Georgia Shrimp and Apalachicola Oysters and FrogTown Cellars, oh my!  Tom Plant, creator of the Wineormous.com  blog, makes us “fiercely proud” with this account of his recent visit… and he’s just getting started.  Read on, then plan your next visit to enjoy your own taste of paradise.

Fiercely Proud – Saint Simons Island

Monday, June 4th, 2012 | Posted by Tom Plant

Saint Simons IslandMedia partner and good friend Leigh Cort has been singing the praises of Saint Simons Island to me for more than two years now. When the opportunity to visit presented itself this April, I jumped on it. I took the redeye to Jacksonville and then was driven to the King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort. Saint Simons Island is located in between Jacksonville and Savannah, but is slightly closer to Jacksonville. It’s one of the 13 main barrier islands along Georgia’s Gulf Coast, protecting the shoreline from winds and surf and providing a nutrient-rich marsh where marine life thrives.

Wild Georgia ShrimpWe crossed the Georgia state line and drove over the causeway onto Saint Simons. We passed through the small town and its quaint businesses and entered the grounds of the magnificent King & Prince. After checking in and taking a brief, much needed nap, I joined Leigh for a small bite and had my first taste of Wild Georgia Shrimp. Big, plump, meaty, sweet and juicy, these shrimp arrived atop a bed of bright green lettuce and red tomatoes with a savory Louis dressing. This visit was off to a delectable start.

Cap Fendig

 

Refueled and refreshed, I joined my fellow writers aboard the Lighthouse Trolley  with the one and only Cap Fendig. A life-long resident of the island, Cap exemplifies what I call the fiercely proud  nature of its natives. A one-time presidential candidate, Cap’s pride in his island home is clearly evident. He loves nothing better than telling visitors why he loves this island as much as he does. We took the trolley to theCoast Guard Maritime Museum, where Curt Smith, Events Coordinator for the Coastal Georgia Historical Society, gave us a thorough overview of how the barrier islands were formed. Sand eroding from the Appalachians centuries ago traveled to the coast creating the islands, and tidal and alluvial rivers deposit nutrients. After watching a video, several of us climbed the narrow ladder to the roof to check out the incredible view.

We met Cap at the beach, where he demonstrated the art of fishing Saint Simons style using basic supplies from the hardware store. We soaked up the sun and the sea breeze before heading back to the King & Prince.

Vinny D'Agostino & Cap Fendig

Vinny D’Agostino, the Hotel’s Food & Beverage Director, comes to the island by way of Rhode Island and Italy. His 23 years in the industry includes stops at The Breakers in Palm Beach, The Ritz-Carlton in Boston and the Sawgrass Marriott in Ponte Vedra Beach. He’s a member of the Court of Master Sommeliers Association and his enthusiasm is contagious. He was anxious to introduce newly hired executive Chef Jeff Kaplan to us as they welcomed us with a Southern Culinary Traditions dinner.

King & Prince

 

We began with cocktails made with spirits from Georgia’s first legal distillery, Thirteenth Colony Distilleries from Americus, Georgia. Ample platters of local artisanal cheeses and charcuterie made for good grazing while we drank southern cocktails and visited. Bud St. Pierre, Director of Sales and Marketing joined us as we sat down to our appetizer course, Apalachiacola Oysters on the half shell with sweet corn, asparagus, tomato and cilantro vinaigrette, paired with FrogTown Cellars Chardonnay from Dahlonega, GA. The oysters were sublime and I was pleasantly surprised by my first taste of Georgia wine. Following an Intermezzo of blackberry sorbet with a mist of blackberry liqueur, we watched as Wild Georgia Low Country Shrimp and Grits were prepared before our eyes. The entrée was paired with another selection from FrogTown Cellars, the 2008 Sangiovese. Both food and wine were exceptionally tasty. All good things must come to an end and this meal concluded with a mouthwatering candied peach crème brulée with CayRum from the Dominican Republic, a favorite of Vinny’s.

 

The King & Prince Beach & Golf ResortHow we were able to pack so much into less than half a day still astounds me. We were just getting warmed up and in the next two days we would enjoy a visit to the King & Prince’s golf course, a seafood demo, a “shrimpin’” adventure, a Georgia food experience and more. I’ll pick up where we left off next time.

Cap Fendig casts his net

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First Seating: King and Prince Shows Off On Opening Night

Monday, May 14th, 2012

Will McGough will make you hungry for our Georgia grown ingredients in this post on his Wake and Wander blog!

First Seating: King and Prince Shows Off On Opening Night

Posted on April 19, 2012 by willmcgough

I arrived at the King and Prince Resort on St. Simons (off the coast ofGeorgia) knowing that I would be participating in a Southern Culinary Showcase, but I had no idea they would put on such a performance the first night.

I actually contributed to the meal – I sautéed the shrimp and prepared the pork, tomato, and corn gravy to accompany the grits. In the past, grits was a dish that reminded me of something served at a bad diner, dry and bland, but when the chef passed me the heavy cream, I knew we were officially in the south.

The brand new Executive Chef Jeff Kaplan (he’s been on the island for ten days) and his crew allowed me to have some fun flipping the shrimp, but eventually it was time for me to step aside, let them do their thing. As the courses began to roll out of the kitchen, I was more than happy to get my tail back to the table.

We started with a spread of Artisan cheeses from Sweet Grass Dairy(Thomasville, GA), paired ridiculously well with local honeys and jams – you can’t really beat a well-thought sweet/salt combo (more info and photos to come… I am going to attend a honey tasting later in the trip).

The main course of shrimp and grits was easily the best version I’ve ever had – it was creamy and the Georgia shrimp are naturally sweet (noticeably so compared to shrimp from other regions… more to come on this later as well).

The first course of fresh oysters stole the show in terms of creativity – they were served with sweet corn and asparagus. Again, the traditional salty-sea taste of the oysters combined with the burst of sweetness in the corn jumped off my palate, and the crunch of the asparagus provided the texture (a good way for first timers to get over the “sliminess” of oysters).

One of the great things I’m realizing about Georgia is the pleasant balance in its signature fare. For every Southern-style comfort dish with heavy cream, there’s a piece of fish or a fresh peach providing a light complement/alternative.

Or you can say screw it – you’re on vacation – and toss the peaches into a crème brulee. What I said about my experience in St. Barths also applies to this version of the classic dessert (see photo):

Had I been in a room by myself, my tongue would have been on the dish.

First two photos courtesy of Desiree Miller:

 

 

 


Apalachicola oysters with sweet corn, asparagus, tomato, cilantro vinaigrette.


Blackberry sorbet with blackberry liqueur (palate cleanser).

 

King and Prince Shrimp & Grits in Tasso Cream Sauce

Tuesday, December 13th, 2011

Marc d’Entremont writes an article at Suite101 about his visit to The King and Prince Resort and eating their Shrimp & Grits, a Southern Culinary Tradition.

King and Prince Resort’s Shrimp and Grits in a Tasso Cream Sauce

The King & Prince Beach & Golf Resort, St. Simons Island, GA, finesses a classic dish served in every southern dinner elevating Shrimp and Grits to stardom.
 

 

Shrimp & Grits in a Tasso Cream Sauce- Marc d’Entremont

It was the end of a pleasant sunny early November day in the now quiet off-season of St. Simons Island, one of Georgia’s premier barrier island destinations. The elegant 1935 King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort , listed on the National Historic Register and Historic Hotels of America, set a table befitting its Old World heritage. The formal place settings with an array of flatware and crystal stemware lay on starched white linen lit by softly glowing candles. The guests are not what the media would identify as royalty or even VIPs. We’re nearly two dozen jaded, or nearly jaded, travel and food journalists – critics to the core.

 

Southern Culinary Traditions

We were the guests of The King and Prince. Our four day tour to explore the culinary traditions of southeastern Georgia was organized by Leigh Cort Publicity. Such media trips involve a considerable amount of activity, not the least of which is eating and drinking. To make an impression worthy of an article the fare has to be more than just free.

Tradition versus an Old Standby

Personally my foodie radar was picking up more an old diner standby rather than a fine tradition when the itinerary indicated that dinner would include a Shrimp and Grits cooking demonstration. Google any of a dozen recipes and discover everything from bullion cubes to extra sharp cheddar used to mask tasteless farm raised frozen shrimp mounded on top of instant grits. Believe me I’ve had my full of disappointing versions.

Chef Dwayne Austell and Vinny D’Agostino

It took only a moment after entering the dining room for my nose to detect a subtle aroma of warm smoked meat. It was emanating from the chafing dish that was keeping the sauce at serving temperature. I should have guessed that a Johnson & Wales University graduate, Vinny D’Agostino, Food and Beverage Director, and Georgia Low Country native Sous Chef Dwayne Austell would rise above the ordinary.

Wild Shrimp and Tasso Ham

Quality ingredients are essential for a great dish and there is no comparison between farm raised and wild shrimp. Fortunately, much of America’s shrimp is wild and the package will be labeled appropriately. The high tides and lush nutrient rich salt marshes of low country and barrier islands provide an excellent clean environment for Georgia’s abundant shrimp. The Georgia White Shrimp is especially plump, meaty and flavorful. Yet the secret to Chef Austell’s outstanding Shrimp and Grits is the addition of smoky, cured Tasso ham – an essential ingredient in much of southern cajun cuisine. What is actually a pork butt rather than a ham gives the cajun spiced light cream sauce a rich flavor that lingers in the mouth.

The Recipe – for 2 servings

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 2/3rd cup diced Tasso ham
  • 1/2 cup fresh or frozen kernel corn
  • 1/2 cup seeded diced tomatoes
  • 4 Tablespoons diced green onions
  • 4 to 6 ounces fresh shelled wild shrimp
  • 2 Tablespoons cajun seasoning mix
  • 1/2 cup grated asiago cheese
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • olive oil
  • cooked grits

Preparation:

  1. First prepare grits using the best recipe I know for Creamy Stone Ground Grits
  2. Add just enough olive oil to lightly cover the bottom of two saute pans and heat over medium setting.
  3. In one pan add the shrimp and cajun seasoning. Saute no more than 5 minutes. Overcooking results in tough shrimp.
  4. In the second pan add the ham and corn and saute for a couple minutes. Add the tomatoes and green onions, combine and saute a few minutes more. Add the heavy cream and asiago cheese. Bring to a simmer and cook for two minutes.
  5. Combine the shrimp and all the pan juices into the sauce.
  6. Serve over the prepared grits.

Wine Pairing

Vinny D’Agostino, a sommelier as well, paired the entree with a nice Georgia Chardonnay from Frogtown Cellars. The minimal acidity of a Chardonnay, preferably unoaked, works well with the creamy sauce. A California or Washington State Chardonnay would be a fine substitute since Georgia wines are not widely distributed.

Even if you’re not dining a few hundred feet from the ocean, this fine recipe from the King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort can conjure memories of warm lazy days under oak trees dripping with Spanish Moss and sea gulls laughing overhead.

Georgia Made, Georgia Grown

Tuesday, November 15th, 2011

Last week The King and Prince hosted an event for food writers featuring Georgia grown food.  We invited ten vendors from around Georgia to speak about their products.  It was a wonderful experience for all that participated.  We learned the history behind the product and the means of production, but also what led each speaker to the industry. They even brought samples for everyone to try!

1. Flat Creek Lodge- Make their own traditional aritsan cheeses and much more.  They have won numerous awards in cheese competitions throughout the country and it is made in Swainsboro, Georiga.

2. Thirteenth Colony Distilleries- Georgia’s only craft distillery.  Their products are Plantation Vodka, Southern Gin, Southern Vodka and Southern Corn Whiskey. They also demonstrated delicious cocktails with their hand crafted spirits.

3. Savannah Bee- Beekeeper and owner Ted Dennard has been keeping bees since he was a child.  He talked about his passion for honey and how he launched his business.  Not only do they make pure delicious honey, but they also have a body care line including hand cream, soaps and lip balms made from honey!

4. Georgia Olive Growers- The attendees of the event had the pleasure of tasting olive oil from the first olive pressing in Georgia.  This is the first harvest of olives on the east coast since the 1800s.

5. Lane Southern Orchards- They have been growing peaches for over a hundred years and have 2,500 acres of peach orchards! We learned all about harvesting peaches.

6. Sugar Marsh Cottage- Gourmet sweets and specialty confections made 30 minutes from St. Simons in Darien.

7. Still Pond Winery- They produce eleven types of Muscadine Wines.  We learned about the health benefits of these wonderful wines.

8. Vidalia Onion- “America’s favorite sweet onion,” a crop that orginated in Georgia during the depression.

9. Wild Georgia Shrimp- Along with a sampling of shrimp, we heard about shrimping history, what makes the wild Georgia shrimp taste so good and why wild shrimp are better than farm raised shrimp.

10. St. Simons Sweets- A local sweets store right here on St. Simons makes their own sweets.  We learned about the history of Georgia pecans.

Olive Tea Brewing

Honeycomb

Low Country Boil with Crab & Wild Georgia Shrimp

As a part of our goal to transform to ”Farm to Table” products in our Restaurant, we plan to highlight each of these Georgia products in our Restaurant for a week in the upcoming months.

*Photos courtesy of Christine & G.W. Tibbetts