Posts Tagged ‘St Simons Island’

Redfern Village, Shopper’s Paradise on St. Simons Island

Friday, September 6th, 2013
Tibi St. Simons Island

Tibi Outlet Store on St. Simons Island

St. Simons Island is known for its picturesque beaches and championship golf courses but did you know that the island is also home to great shopping?

Redfern Village is located right off of Frederica Road and is a quick drive (or a short bike ride) from our resort. Whether you are purchasing a gift for a friend, looking for the perfect outfit for a night out, or just want to treat yourself to something nice, Redfern Village has it all.

Moncriefs – Women’s Clothing

Two Friends - Gifts, Clothing, Accessories and more

Wild & Personal - Clothing Boutique

Viola’s Market - Gifts, Clothing, Kitchen Items, Accessories and more

The Vine - Garden Market & Design Studio

Tibi Outlet Store - Women’s Clothing

Davis Love III’s, Paddle & Putt - Stand Up Paddleboards & Gear

Wine Body & Soul – Wine Shop

The Queen Bee - Jewelry & Accessories

Cutie Patooties – Children’s Shop

Learn more about other St. Simons shopping areas here!

Take the Teens on Vacation

Thursday, June 27th, 2013

There are only three things that teenage boys are interested in: food, girls and sports. The order may change depending on the kid, but these pretty much sum it up. Incessant video gaming counts as sports. Food will usually take a lesser position in the hierarchy…except when they’re hungry, which is all the time unless there are, well, girls and sports available.

So the ideal vacation for a teen boy will bring all these things together (and where there’s an environment parents can enjoy, too).  The simple solution: the beach.

We told our 15-year-old Brandon that we were heading for the beach.  He was only so enthused.  It seems that hanging around at the local pool and posing for the girls there was a better choice.  And how could he play his favorite video games at the beach? Was there anything to do?  The suggestion that there were plenty of books to catch up on earned a derisive snort and a roll of the eyes.  How could we be so lame?  Boring!

So it was with high hopes and one bad attitude in the back seat (“You’re going and that’s that!”) that we set off for the King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort on Georgia’s Saint Simon’s Island.

At check-in, the soaring lobby and the relaxed yet elegant ambience assured that this would be no cramped sojourn in a rickety beach motel.  Looking straight back through the famed restaurant, the tantalizing view of the ocean (the only oceanfront restaurant on the entire island) teased us with the promise of adventure after our long ride.

St Simons Beach Fun

St Simons Beach Fun

We were taken to our villa, a modern, super clean and superbly equipped home away from home. The view through the big glass doors and the terrace was remarkable.  A light breeze rippled the ocean.  The tide was partly out so the beach was expansive and waves broke over some sandbars right out front.  Directly below, an enormous pool glistened bright blue.  People were seated on a patio near the water’s edge at a snack bar. There were umbrellas and bikers and people strolling on the beach, swimming in the surf. It was colorful and…happy.

Some boys about Brandon’s age were throwing a football while some bikinied girls looked on. “Hey! I know that kid! He goes to my school! Can I go down to the beach?”

We said yes. There was a pause. “Don’t you have to go with me?”

We said no.  It’s about as safe a place as could be. We gave him some money for the snack bar. “You’re giving me money!?”

We watched as he joined the group.  A few handshakes, some shy glances at the girls, and the football regained the air, with Brandon in the circle.

We strolled down the beach, feeling the stresses and strains of the everyday work week melt away with every step.  After a while, we returned to the hotel.  We went up to our villa, expecting Brandon to be buried in his iPad, but he wasn’t there. There was a note: “Gone to the Gym.”

After some texting, we all met at the restaurant.  The high ceilings and ceiling high windows looked right over the surf.  And the menu was even more impressive. The big, juicy Tavern Burger made Brandon smile, although he could barely pay attention to the food because one of the girls he met at the beach was at an adjoining table.

A signature King & Prince Crab Cake was a perfect appetizer, as were the savory Black Truffle Fries & Aioli. Then there was an amazing Crab Mac‘n Cheese, and a Low Country Shrimp & Grits, the King & Prince haute cuisine version of a perennial coastal favorite. If seafood hadn’t pleased, there were savory choices like Kurobota Pork, a whimsical Chicken and Waffles, a Short Rib Pot Roast and much, much more. The menu is large and creative, and dinner was incredible.

After dinner, Brandon and a few of his new friends from the beach went out to the pool. The entire pool was lit and cast a bright blue glow.  We all stood at the patio rail and watched the sea roll in and back.  The stars were brilliant.  Brandon said his good nights and came upstairs with us to our villa, after making plans to meet the next day.  There was a bike ride for us all in the offing; Brandon and his new friends would ride up with us to the historic fort at Frederica, and we’d come back for lunch at the King & Prince, and then on to the beach for the afternoon. There was tennis in the plan for the next few days, along with a ghost tour and a ride on a real shrimp boat, and some fishing off the Village Pier, all planned with the helpful folks at the King & Prince.

Our vacation couldn’t have had a better beginning. Look like we may have found a new family tradition.

A Father, Daughter Experience

Friday, April 19th, 2013

My daughter Whitney and I are morning people.  

We have a regular routine when we are at home. We wake up just before daylight, and most mornings, my nine year old daughter reads, plays and organizes her dolls and stuffed animals, and sometimes, when I’m not looking, sneaks in a little television.  I’m usually sitting in the kitchen poring over emails, reading news websites and planning my work day.
 

For Spring Break this year, my family took an amazing journey to the King and Prince Hotel on Saint Simons Island. The hotel was our home for 4 days. We rode bikes around the island, swam at the hotel pool, visited Fort Frederica and Cumberland Island National Parks and explored the entire island.  It was the best vacation my family has ever experienced. 

But despite all those wonderful activities, my fondest memory were the early mornings I spent with my daughter at sunrise.

St. Simons Island Beach

You see, as morning people, we discovered something very special at the King and Prince–the sunrise over the Atlantic Ocean.  Each morning, while my wife, who is not a morning person, was sleeping, Whitney and I awoke before sunrise, threw on some warm clothes, and walked a few hundred feet to the beach, holding hands, to watch the sun come up.  Three mornings. Three sunrises. Three memories with my daughter that will last a lifetime.

 Barefoot in the sand, and letting the ankle deep waves rush over our feet, my daughter and I explored the beach, following the plovers, terns and various shorebirds.

We found shells. Including the shell of a pre-historic horseshoe crab that at first frightened us, because it looked like a World War I army helmet that had washed ashore.

But the highlight of each morning was the sunrise.  Each different.  The first morning we saw rays of light struggling to breakthrough the grey and cloudy sky, creating spotlights. The sky looked like a laser light show.

Then on the second morning the entire sky turned blood orange, the clouds shielding the sun just enough to protect our eyes from looking directly into the sun. We stared at the sun, a fireball, gently rising on the horizon.

And on our last day, a clear crystal blue sky.  So clear, you could see the streaks in the sky where airplanes had flown. It was also getting warmer.  That refreshing day, we could tell spring was coming.

It has now been about week since we’ve come home from our Saint Simons Island Spring Break vacation.  Whitney and I are still 

Sunrise on St Simonsmorning people.  We get up early, I start to work, she prepares for school, and my wife gets a few more minutes of sleep. We are back into our routine.  But a couple of times, since coming back, Whitney has hugged me in the early morning before daylight, and asked to see the sunrise.  We throw on warmer clothes, clasp hands together and journey outside to explore and watch the sun come up.

While we watch the sun come up over our city, we remember our special gift from Saint Simons Island, the sunrise, the place and that special time and memory with my daughter.

 

Written by Pat Byington, editor of The Green Register

A Legend for One & All Rests on St. Simon’s Island

Thursday, June 14th, 2012

A Legend for One & All Rests on St. Simon’s Island

 

Places of beauty are numerous, but there are very few that when you walk through them, you can actually feelthe history that surrounds you. The scent of the gardens outside, the brilliant sun shining through a stained glass window that has lit the faces of many prominent individuals over the centuries…this the place we will speak about today; an incredible location that has so many tales to tell.

On St. Simon’s Island – the true gem of the Golden Isles located off the Coast of Georgia – sits a mystical place full of ancient tales, history, as well as a few ghosts that perhaps roam the grounds where they were the most happy.

We first mentioned Christ Church to you in an article regarding a tour company. Tours offered by an adventurer named, Cap Fendig, that take visitors all through the majesty of St. Simon’s Island – from plantations to the shopping district. One of the most amazing stops on this tour is Christ Church, and after hearing about it and reading about it, I must tell you that this is one historian who is truly in love.

 

Therefore, I want to spread that love to all of you out there who have a passion for beauty, the past, and even things that go ’bump’ in the night.

This site is a Victorian church dating all the way back to the late 1800’s. The stunning stained glass windows allow visitors to revel in a lost world, but inside the walls there is absolute peace. A spot to close one’s eyes and try to imagine those famous and infamous people who once sat in these pews, and reflect on how far life has come.

One of the most exciting things for the historian or the adventurer is the fact that the church also has beautiful grounds that include a cemetery. There are so many who were laid to rest here – from people who changed the world with their writing, to the founders of the Island – that it becomes a true walk through time.

Being a writer, one of the most amazing souls who rests there is the prestigious author, Eugenia Price, who wrote many novels over her long career about St. Simon’s Island and the surrounding areas. In fact, she was almost obsessed with this particular place, when she came across Christ Church on a visit and learned of all the amazing backstories of the people who created and lived in the historic town. Her research and these true larger-than-life characters became the biggest part of her world, as she moved to St. Simon’s permanently and became a part of the ever-growing history in the Christ Church cemetery.

One site that you can not forget is what the locals deem, the Wesley Oak. This huge, gnarled tree may look like something out of a Tim Burton movie – some mystical place where inside dreams dwell – and it probably does, seeing as that a great deal of history is wrapped up in its many branches. It was beside this tree long ago that the Methodist preachers, John and Charles Wesley, preached in the very early days of this colony of Frederica. Ones with imagination can almost hear their voices offer praise and celebration as they walk along the pristine, secluded path leading to even more statuary that sits across the road from the church.

Being one of the oldest churches in Georgia, Christ Church has that special aura about it. Resting in tall grass that blows ever so gently, it almost seems as if the souls are still speaking to one another during one of their blissful Sundays where they got together to catch up on the life of the town and the latest gossip. Founded on St. Simons Island nearly seventy years after the island was first settled by English colonists, amazingly enough worship has been continuous since 1736.

The people who were  the largest part of the Christ Church – and who also reside in the cemetery – were James Oglethorpe and the first English settlers who arrived in 1736. A few months later, Reverend Charles Wesley, who also served as Secretary for Indian Affairs and Chaplain to General James Oglethorpe, entered his ministry at Frederica, and from 1736 to 1766, the first religious services on the island were conducted by John Wesley, George Whitfield, and other clergy members.  Read More>>>> 

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The King & Prince Resort Celebrates a True Hero!

Monday, April 30th, 2012

Lewis Colam is rowing to raise money and awareness for Alzheimer’s.  The King and Prince hosted Lewis for a night of much needed rest from his voyage.

 

The King & Prince Resort Celebrates a True Hero!

 

We have spoken about the amazing King and Prince Resort in many articles over the past few months. We have spoken about the amazing members of their incredibly gifted staff. We have spoken about the luxury that each and every room provides. We‘ve presented you with the lasting images of the glorious scenery that involves flocks of nesting Sandhill Cranes and dolphins swimming in the surf as you walk along the shore of the sparkling Atlantic Ocean. But there’s so much more to say…

 

It’s been 75 years that this amazing resort has been entertaining guests. Seventy-five years of hospitality that has been found to be second to none. Recently, however, King and Prince was able to honor a hero in the minds of many, and offered their incredible hospitality to a man who has taken on a seriously difficult challenge for the purpose of bringing much-needed funds and worldwide awareness to the issue of Alzheimer’s. His name is Lewis Colam, and by the time I’m finished telling you about him, you will want to jump ‘on board’ with his spectacular quest and root for him every step of the way!

 

On March 3rd, Lewis Colam set off from Miami in a fifteen-foot, open-decked row boat (which offers no coverage from the wind, rain and whatever else Mother Nature has in mind to throw at him. His mission is to sail 1400 miles along the East Coast in order to raise $20,000 dollars for the Fisher Center for Alzheimer’s Research Foundation. (www.ALZinfo.org).

 

The Fisher Center is comprised of internationally renowned scientists under the direction of Nobel laureate, Dr. Paul Greengard. If you do not yet know, Dr. Greengard has been at the forefront of seminal research that has provided the conceptual framework for all modern day investigations into Alzheimer’s disease. The Fisher Center, headquartered in New York City, works with other leading research institutions around the world. Dedicated to three main goals, the Fisher Center strives to understand the cause of Alzheimer’s; find a cure for the horrific disease; and improve the care of people who live with the disease, in order to enhance their quality of life – not to mention offering support for the families and caregivers who must watch the devastation of their loved ones.

 

Lewis Colam is one of millions who had to watch a person he cared very much for succumb to Alzheimer’s, and he truly wanted to do something to bring this disease into the headlines. He wanted to take on a mission that would bring people from across the globe to their computer’s and cell phones – creating a team that would work together to stop this illness in its tracks.

 

What people will be most surprised about is the fact that Lewis has no prior rowing experience. Like so many who are out there rowing, biking, and heralding their expeditions in the media, Lewis is accomplishing his feat with absolutely no support. What I mean by this is the fact that there are no vehicle’s or people following him to help him along the way, or to watch out for his safety; he is completely alone, with not even a motor or sail for support. To do something like this is amazing, but when you add in the fact that Lewis has no seafaring experience whatsoever, you – like me – will become immediately mind-boggled by the entire journey.

 

I was lucky enough to speak with Lewis on his boat this afternoon, and he is still in good spirits. In fact, he likes the ‘traveling’ part the best; he loves the scenery and exploring all those hidden areas that most of us have never even gotten the chance to see. One of those hidden areas is on St. Simons Island, where the King and Prince Resort has its immaculate home base. The marshes, the vivid colors of the flowers – a picture that only Monet could do justice to. Lewis was offered a stay at the King and Prince as he ‘sailed by’ on his mission, and Lewis told me that the short time he spent there was beyond memorable.

 

He spoke of how lovely the staff was and how incredible it felt to be treated to a room surrounded by beautiful pools, tennis courts, etc. He said it was extremely comforting, after being out in the elements, to have a taste of real luxury.

 

Before the sun sets tomorrow, assuming Mother Nature is supportive, Lewis will be halfway through with his 1400 mile journey along the East Coast of America. I can’t speak enough about how (I suppose it’s cynical to insert the word ‘surprised’ in this sentence) so, let’s just go with say emotional I became after speaking with him. This particular journey is occurring with no PR, no agent, no headlines, no ‘future book contract’ in the works if Lewis achieves his goal…nothing. This is simply a man who’s doing something completely unselfish. He‘s trying to shine a light on one of the most frightening diseases to behold; and not only for the precious soul that’s diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, but also for the friends and family who must watch the decline with absolutely no way of helping the situation.

 

Lewis has also been most generous with his own website, adding some pretty fun and cool features that his followers and fans can use in order to feel as if they’re an actual part of his journey. Lewis has a real time GPS on his website that shows everyone exactly where he’s located at the moment. He ‘checks in’ every day, blogs, and leaves a short audio message to update listeners on all the trials, tribulations and blessings that have occurred during his trek. He even posts updates on Twitter and Facebook.

 

One of the most beautiful facets of his website is the photo album that Lewis has kept. From the pictures of people who have greeted Lewis at his stops to the images of the toll that the trip has taken thus far – fans and followers get an in-depth view of each and every day that Lewis braves the sea.

 

By welcoming this amazing man and providing the red-carpet treatment, the King and Prince Resort certainly honored a true hero that has taken on an incredible challenge for all the right reasons.

 

I am calling to all you generous and amazing readers out there to join with the King and Prince Resort - and the giving donors who have already been a part of this challenge! Help Lewis meet his goal, raise the money he desires, and join the fight to find a cure for Alzheimer’s once and for all!

 

Until Next Time, Everybody.

Amy

 

Head RIGHT NOW to these Lewis Colam links and be amazed!

 

http://www.iamfinechallenge.org/wp

https://twitter.com/#!/us_rowed_trip

http://www.iamfine.com

http://www.facebook.com/pages/Lewis-is-rowing-from-Miami-to-New-York/106385046157503

 

And although you may not be able to follow Lewis through the sea, you can follow his footsteps to the doors of the luxurious King & Prince Resort!

 

http://www.kingandprince.com/

http://twitter.com/#!/kingandprince

http://www.facebook.com/TheKingandPrince

http://blog.kingandprince.com/

http://www.youtube.com/user/KingandPrince1

http://www.flickr.com/photos/kingandprinceresort/

http://www.kingandprince.com/

 

 

The King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort

201 Arnold Road
St. Simons Island, Georgia 31522
(912) 638-3631: Phone

(800) 342-0212: Reservations
(912) 638-7699: Fax

Source: http://staugnews.com/2012/04/11/7426.html

Explore the Golden Isle of St. Simons

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

A great article by Carolyn Burns Bass posted in Greer’s OC about The King and Prince Resort and what to see and do on St. Simons Island.

Explore the Golden Isle of St. Simons

01.20.12

Review by Carolyn Burns Bass

It’s not hard to understand why this stretch of the Georgia coast is known as the Golden Isles. Miles of marsh grass wave in the breeze, carved by streams, rivers, and inlets to form a jigsaw puzzle of islands. The sun rises like a glittering coin over the Atlantic and blankets the marshlands in gold and amber as it sets over the isles. Poised on the mouth of the sound leading up to the bustling port city of Brunswick, is St. Simons Island, the largest of Georgia’s Golden Isles.

The Spanish named the island and the sound after a Catholic saint during 16th century exploration of the Southeastern coastline. You can see Spanish influences throughout the region, including the architecture. Mediterranean arches, turrets, clay tiles and stucco make haunting backdrops for the Spanish moss dripping off the massive trees overarching the buildings and lining the streets and lanes. The island has maintained its quaint seaside charm through decades of development in the islands and cities surrounding this wild island treasure.

The King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort

The jewel of this golden isle is the King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort. Perched on the white sandy shore near the mouth of St. Simons Sound, this historic hotel offers panoramic views of the Atlantic Ocean and the coastline stretching north and south. Built in 1935 as a private dance club for the well-heeled of the area, it added lodging to its original structure in 1941 and opened to the public as a hotel. There was nothing as magnificent as The King and Prince anywhere along the Southeast coast when it was built and even today it rises above many of the cookie-cutter resorts now dotting the coast and the Isles.

A spacious, bright and airy lobby greets you from the main entry of the King and Prince. You can see the Mediterranean design in the arches that line the coastal stretch of the lobby interior. Natural wood bannisters, trim and ceiling beams encasing dark embossed tin tiles add warmth to the lobby’s light interior. Just beyond the reception desk is a fountain, surrounded by palms, lush greenery and flowers, and an indoor pool and whirlpool (one of five pools located throughout the resort).

Guests at the King and Prince have a deluxe array of choices in room types to meet budget or family needs. Oceanfront rooms in the historic building are only steps from the beach, with spacious bathrooms and separate sitting areas. Luxury amenities such as in-room Keurig coffee stations, Bath & Body Works toiletries, and large flat screen televisions are standard in every room. Stretching beyond the historic main building are the Beach Villas. These roomy accommodations offer two- or three-bedroom apartment size villas with master bedrooms, full kitchens, dining areas and private patios or balconies.

Stepping up the game in privacy and luxury at the King and Prince are the Residences, which comprise of six individual houses spread throughout the resort to include quaint beach cottages and even executive-level houses with ample meeting and entertaining areas (with as many as five bedrooms!).

Scenic and Challenging Golf

Competing with beach and ocean activities on St. Simons Island are the resort’s tennis courts, pools and golf course. While the formal name of the King and Prince includes “golf resort,” the greens are actually a bit of a drive to the northern-most end of the island. Known as the Hampton Club, this golf course shuttles hotel guests straught to the course for a day of golf among the salt marshes, swampy lagoons, towering palmettos and grand oaks draped with Spanish moss.

The course was renovated in 2009 with renewal in turf and design enhancements to the original 18-hole, 72-par design. Four of the holes sit upon individual marsh islands accessible by elevated cart bridges, making for challenging play. Practice areas include a driving range, putting green and a chipping green, and golfers can grab lunch or post game cocktails in the roomy clubhouse. You can take a virtual flyover of the entire course from the resort’s website for an overview of this distinctive course.

Georgia Coastal Cuisine at its Finest

Director of food and beverage, Vinny D’Agostino, revitalized the King and Prince’s food culture when he joined the staff in May 2011. A master sommelier and culinary arts graduate from Johnson and Wales University, D’Agostino brought more than two decades of creative culinary experience from some of the nation’s top hotels and restaurants. Food was the centerpiece of D’Agostino’s large Italian family, inspiring his passion for taste, texture and temptation, and it shows in everything he prepares or directs. Be sure to try D’Agostino’s signature shrimp and grits, made with Georgia’s wild white shrimp and Tasso ham in a spicy cream sauce that wraps the tongue in savory delight.

The King and Prince is renowned throughout the Golden Isles for its Friday night seafood buffet and its sumptuous Sunday brunch. Set in the resort’s Delegal room, the Friday night seafood buffet features various preparations of the region’s distinctive wild white shrimp, plus platters of crab legs, chilled and steamed; oysters, both fried and on the half-shell; clams and mussels, along with entrees of salmon, catfish, tilapia, sole, grouper and other chef selections. Sunday brunch includes an omelet bar, plus a wide variety of southern comfort foods such as grits, plain, creamy with cheese, or spiced to delight with shrimp; smoked BBQ ribs; buttermilk fried chicken; succulent pot roast and gravy, crispy fried catfish and plenty of other chef surprises.

The Delegal room itself is a thing of beauty. Commanding the eye is the view of the Atlantic from the windows lining the oceanfront wall. Set above the oceanfront windows and around the entire room are eleven spectacular stained glass windows depicting the history of St. Simons island.

Additional dining choices at the King and Prince include the King’s Tavern set in the hotel’s turret lined with oceanfront windows for stunning ocean views, the Atrium Café where snacks and refreshments, along with barista-prepared coffees and teas are served, plus the seasonal (March through October) Paradise Beach Bar and Grill located beachside with casual fare and cocktail service.

More to Do and See On St. Simons

Guests not getting enough exercise running or strolling along the beach, bicycling through town, or browsing through the myriad shops on St. Simons, have free access to treadmills, ellipticals, free weights, and exercise balls in the fitness facility next to the tennis courts.

Set only steps away from the beach guests may rejuvenate body and soul in the Royal Treatment Cottage, an intimate retreat house with a full menu of massage therapies. Lunch can be ordered from the concierge and enjoyed in the quiet of the cottage.

Out and about in St. Simons you’ll find boutiques and souvenir stores, coffeehouses and cafes, candy stores and cocktail happy hours. You can rent a bicycle at Ocean Motion (walking distance from the King and Prince) and pedal around the Island’s 21 miles winding bike paths.

Hop on the Lighthouse Trolley for a guided tour of St. Simons island. The trolley can take you from the Coast Guard station, now a Maritime Museum with history of the island–including its fascinating mission as a coast watching and training facility during WWII–to the working lighthouse; to the picturesque Christ Church, the first English church in Georgia; around town and through the moss-lined lanes from the north end to the south. If you’re lucky to get Cap Fielding as your trolley guide, you’re in for a treat with his arcane knowledge of the region’s colorful history.

On the Water Excitement

Travelers seeking new experiences can get thrills and chills from a shrimping trip on the waters off St. Simons island on The Lady Jane, a former working shrimp boat now USCG certified to carry passengers. The Lady Jane, run by Captain Larry Credle, is an educational and tourism expedition not to be missed.

Guests board The Lady Jane in nearby Brunswick, then head into the waters of St. Simons Sound. Once clear of the marshes, Captain Credle drops his shrimp net and trawls until he figures he’s got a good catch. The net drips with surprise when lifted, then released on the ship’s sorting deck. All hands aboard have a chance to sort the treasures in the net, the jewel of the catch being the wild white Georgia shrimp. It’s not unusual for the net to bring up stingrays, puffer fish, several varieties of flounder, shrimp and crab—including the distinctive horseshoe crabs–plus beautiful whelks. A naturalist on board identifies the different fish in the catch, including the occasional catch of a loggerhead sea turtle. When turtles are caught, they are weighed, measured, and photographed, then released. The details are sent to the Georgia Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

Everything but the wild white shrimp is released back into the sea. While cruising back to harbor on The Lady Jane, a shipmate cleans and shells the shrimp, then serves it fresh on a platter with homemade cocktail sauce and lemon. Seafood doesn’t get fresher than this.

Getting to St. Simons Island

St. Simons Island is easily accessible from international airports at Savannah/Hilton Head to the north and Jacksonville to the south, while Delta brings in three flights a day to nearby Brunswick Golden Isles Airport.

The King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort, 201 Arnold Rd., St. Simons Island, GA 31522, 912-638-3631, www.kingandprince.com.

Holidays at The King and Prince: 2011 Edition

Monday, January 2nd, 2012

It has been another great holiday season at The King and Prince!  Right after Thanksgiving our staff worked hard to decorate the hotel with trees, garlands, poinsettias and our huge tree in the Resort lobby. We also had gingerbread houses on display created by local elementary students and King and Prince employees.  Festivities throughout the month included visits with Santa, a choir performance and a family holiday party. Here are some pictures from the month long festivities.

 

 

 

 

 

The King Estate Wine Tasting at The King and Prince

Wednesday, October 5th, 2011

As summer winds down to a close and the first crisp, crinkling of fall whispers around the corner, The King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort is making this fall all about wine.  The resort hosted two wine tastings and seminars Wednesday, September 28th, both of which featured The King Estate label.

King Estate Winery

King Estate Winery of Eugene, Oregon celebrates 20 years of winemaking this year, and in addition to producing quality wine, King Estate has become synonymous with producing wines of exceptional quality using organic & sustainable farming methods, meticulous fruit selection, impeccable winemaking practices, and judicious blending.  The beautiful estate of 1,033 acres is certified organic and includes 470 acres of organic vineyards, as well as 30 acres of fruits, vegetables, and flowers. The Estate is crowned by the charming, European-style winery, where the winemaking process is also certified organic.

Vinny D’Agostino, Food and Beverage Director at The King and Prince, officiated the tastings which were presented by Randy Ford and Gary Lynn, representatives from the winery.  The first tasting served those in the trade locally here on St. Simons.  Those in attendance included Guy Trapani, Sommelier from Sea Island’s The Cloister; Mark Gagaliano, Wine Consultant with Harris Teeter Supermarkets; Susan Whitfield, Wine Consultant with Winn Dixie Supermarkets; Tom Delaney, owner of Delaney’s Bistro, and many other servers and bartenders from such local favorites as Coastal Kitchen, Ocean Lodge, and the Sea Island Resort.

The second tasting was hosted by Aaron Krisfalusi and Jason Degoursay of The Still and Winery (www.thestillandwinery.com) here on St. Simons.  The cost was $15 per person and included 6 wines and appetizers.  Each tasting featured King Estate wines including:

Signature Pinot Gris 2008- rated by Wine Spectator| Top 100 Wines | Wine & Spirits rated it 92 Points

Signature Pinot Noir 2010 Vintage- rated by Wine Spectator at 89 points and declared BEST BUY by Wine Enthusiast at 90 points

Acrobat Pinot Gris 2010 and Pinot Noir 2009 Oregon, both received over 90 points from Wine & Spirits AND Wine Enthusiast

Domiane Pinot Gris 2009 and Doamine Pinot Noir 2008, This wine has a very limited production, and the grape clones are from France.

Vin Glace Oregon Pinot Gris 2007 (This wine is a style of ice wine, or dessert wine)

NxNW “Wallua Benches” Vineyard Riesling 2010- featured on the cover of December 2010 Wine Spectator

NxNW Cabernet Sauvignon, Columbia Valley  2008 - Wine Spectator 95-100pt rated

This was The Still’s first wine tasting hosted in conjunction with The King and Prince, and we look forward to partnering with them again in the future.  Keep an eye on our Facebook page, Twitter feed, and blog for more information about our upcoming plans to produce a series of informal, relaxed, and fun wine events.

Remember, the best way to ward off the chill of fall is by sharing a great bottle of wine with a great group of friends.

The Still and Winery

America’s 10 Best Islands

Thursday, December 2nd, 2010

In AOL Travel’s August 2010 article of America’s 10 Best Islands, St. Simons appeared as the number 3 best island.

3. St. Simons Island, Georgia

Saint Simons Island

Fishing on St Simons Island

The largest of Georgia’s four Golden Isles, St. Simons has beckoned bluebloods and birders for a century with marshes, maritime forests, and Mediterranean Revival mansions. The island’s location made it a strategic maritime point: Explore Fort Frederica National Monument, where colonists won a major naval battle during the Revolutionary war and learn more at the WPA-built 1935 Old Coast Guard Station that houses the Maritime Center museum. Golfers can play hundreds of challenging holes between St. Simons and neighboring Sea and Jekyll Islands. Patrol the waters on a working shrimp boat, sail on a dolphin-watching tour, or just bask on pearly sands.

Fun Fact: The 104-foot St. Simons Lighthouse (a working navigational beacon operational since 1872) and its brick Victorian light-keeper’s residence were renovated in 2010.

“Georgia Sea Islands” Listed in National Geographic’s Top Rated List

Wednesday, November 17th, 2010

The Georgia Sea Islands, which describes the islands off the coast of Georgia and includes St. Simons Island, were listed in the National Geographic Top Rated List for the first time ever.

Read about all 99 Coastal Destinations or about the Sea Islands rating.

Traveler’s annual destination scorecard focuses on 99 coastal areas, from Italy to Mozambique. A panel of 340 experts in sustainable tourism and destination stewardship rates this geographically and culturally representative sample of the world’s waterside locales.

Score: 74

Native Americans, British soldiers, African slaves, and wealthy late 19th-century vacationers have all left their marks on Georgia’s sun-soaked barrier islands. Local residents have worked to safeguard relics of this multi-layered history. The islands’ ecology is also in good shape. Though pressure to overbuild is mounting, most islands remain either “undeveloped or tastefully developed.”

Here is a representative sampling of additional anonymous comments from the panelists. They are not necessarily the views of the National Geographic Society:

“Few places on the Atlantic coast are as well preserved as the barrier islands of Georgia. Cumberland Island is managed by the National Park Service, Jekyll Island is a Georgia state park, Sapelo and Ossabaw Islands are largely undeveloped, and even Sea Island and St. Simon’s Island are tastefully developed at low scale and density.”

“Very pretty and low-key. There is some development, but in general it seems to be under control. Beaches are wide and flat, and they slope gently into the water. This makes for relaxing, family-friendly beach activity. Towns can get crowded in high season, but they have retained a sense of cultural identity.”

“Beautiful setting and shaded by abundant live oaks. In addition to beautiful white beaches, the islands offer visitors access to many historic and archaeological sites. There has been pressure to overdevelop, but smart land-use planning has led to a nice mix of preservation and development.”