Posts Tagged ‘St Simons Island Lighthouse’

Travel & Leisure Names St. Simons Island One of America’s Favorite Towns

Friday, November 1st, 2013
Lighthouse

St. Simons Island Lighthouse

The readers of Travel & Leisure Magazine voted St. Simons Island one of America’s favorite towns. The secret about our quaint, coastal community is finally out! Why do you love St. Simons Island?

To read the full article, click on the link.

An Offbeat Activity for Your Destination Wedding Guests: Try a Ghost Walk

Monday, October 29th, 2012
St. Simons Lighthouse

Haunted Lighthouses in the US

‘Tis the season for all things spooky and scary right about now.  And let’s face it, planning any wedding can sometimes generate a few shades of the macabre.  Why not face the demons head on and schedule a “Ghost Walk of St. Simons” tour one enchanted evening with your resort wedding guests?  After all, Coastal Living ranks the St. Simons lighthouse as one of the Top Ten Haunted Lighthouses in the US.  You’ll walk in the footsteps of the past, learn a little local history……..and it’s dog- and kid-friendly.   Your guests will love it – and you for daring to diverge from the beaten path.  Then, the next day as you lounge on the beach or in one of the King and Prince’s six swimming pools, you might just feel a little more connected to the sights and sounds of this very special beach wedding resort.

Time for Good Food

Thursday, December 29th, 2011

Rachel writes in her blog, “Time for Good Food,” about her trip to St. Simons and all the sites she saw and food she ate at The King and Prince.

Monday, November 14, 2011

Inspired by St. Simon’s Island

A week ago today I was at St. Simon’s Island, Georgia taking in the beautiful scenery and stuffing my belly with delicious food. Magical sounds cliché, but it really was an amazing trip that I won’t soon forget. I was invited by The King and Prince Resort and their publicist Leigh Cort, along with other journalists and bloggers from around the country, to be a part of a media trip focused on Southern culinary traditions. My friend Nikiwas also one of the journalists, so we rode down together.For someone like me who is enamored with history, food and the idea of eating locally and sustainably, it was sheer heaven. I learned so much, tasted so much and am so inspired, this is going to have to be several posts. Maybe a trilogy? You’ll see what I mean in a minute.

Christ Church – the most visited attraction on St. Simons Island

I vaguely remember spending a day sightseeing on St. Simon’s Island as a child. One memory that stands out is visiting the moss draped Christ Church and its cemetery. I was excited to get to see it again all these years later. The parish was founded in 1736, though the current church building dates to 1884. A walk through Christ Church’s cemetery inspired prolific Georgia writer, Eugenia Price, to pen her first historical novel The Beloved Invader. The book brought to life the church’s rector Anson Dodge, Jr. and led to additional books, New Moon Rising and Lighthouse – known as the St. Simon’s Trilogy. Interestingly, Price stayed at The King and Prince in 1961 when she discovered the island that would define her career as a writer. Tourists still come to St. Simon’s today inspired by her books. Who knows, maybe I’ll be inspired to write a historical novel, but for now I’ll settle on a trilogy of blog posts. This first: an overview rich with photos.

The exterior of The King and Prince’s historic hotel building.

The King and Prince was built in 1935 and is the only oceanfront hotel on the island. I think that’s what sets St. Simon’s apart from other tourist destinations. It doesn’t feel touristy. You won’t find the high-rise condominiums and tacky beach stores. It’s quiet, laid back, upscale in some ways, but unassuming.Naturally, it’s a popular destination for weddings and romantic getaways. However, I’m totally inspired to take my family back there.

A wedding photo shoot I happened to catch out the window.

The beach is great, but there are also miles and miles of golden marshlands that are especially beautiful at sunset. Growing abundantly in the marshlands and estuaries is Spartina, the golden hued grass that gives St. Simon’s Island and other nearby barrier islands their nickname, “The Golden Isles.”

Marshlands at dusk.

And there’s the Lighthouse. And the cute village with shops and restaurants. And the waterfront park. And the Maritime Museum that is housed in a former Coast Guard Station.

Oceanfront park with St. Simons Lighthouse in the background.Maritime Center and Museum

I could go on and on, but I know you are probably wondering: what about the food? This is a food blog after all! Most of our meals were served at The King and Prince under the direction of its Food and Beverage Director, Vinny D’Agostino. While on staff for just a short while, D’Agostino is making great strides in bringing local farmers and food artisans ”to the table” to enhance the dining program at the resort. Honestly, going in to this I was not expecting the food to be that great. I’ve had some pretty bland, uninspiring hotel food in the past — but I have to say that the food I tasted at the King and Prince was really delicious. The shrimp and grits, I swear, may have been the best I ever tasted. I’m going to attempt to make them at home and share the recipe with you in the next post in my trilogy!

Shrimp and Grits made highlighted with Tasso ham, fresh corn and tomato.

One afternoon we had the pleasure of meeting food growers and artisans from around the state and sampling their fare. The most exciting thing I tasted was the first pressing of olive oil made from Georgia-grown olives thanks to Georgia Olive Farms. It’s so new that it isn’t even on the market yet. We also tasted cheese from Flat Creek Lodge, muscadine wine from Still Pond Vineyards, 13th Colony Distillery liquors, chocolates from Sugar Marsh Cottage, Wild Georgia Shrimp, Savannah Bee Company honey and peach products from Lane Southern Orchards — to name a few. I’ll definitely share more with you. Remember, my trilogy?

Georgia made products we tasted.

On our final day at the King and Prince, we ate breakfast in the elegant Delegal Room — once the ballroom of the old resort. I imagined how many dances, weddings, receptions and important events must have taken place in this stained glass adorned room with sweeping ocean views. I doctored this photo up a bit to look “old,” much like the actual historic photos that lined the lobby hallway and are featured in each guest room. It makes me feel happy.

Pretending it’s 1951

I love places with a sense of history, natural beauty and authentic Southern charm. You will definitely find that at The King and Prince and on St. Simon’s Island. Now, time for a short disclaimer: The King and Prince provided me with a complimentary stay and meals, but did not pay me to write this or endorse the resort in any way. By being a gracious host, showing me the island and sharing the spotlight with other local businesses and attractions, they made me fall in love. I’ll definitely be back!

Patricia Mack’s Gayot Guide Review

Monday, April 18th, 2011

Patricia Mack reviews her stay at The King and Prince in Gayot.

King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort, Georgia – Hotel Review

A 75-Year-Old Gem Just Off Georgia’s Coast

by Patricia Mack

georgia accommodations

An aerial view of The King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort

Peering through the balcony doors of an oceanfront room at the King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort, it is hard to keep in mind the rich and complex history of this locale. St. Simons Island, a barrier island just off Georgia’s coast, has seen political turmoil and conflict, and yet, looking out on the Atlantic’s breaking waves, how could one think of anything other than the panoramic vistas and glorious natural beauty?

Tides come and go, herons feed and sea breezes fill the air — this has been the backdrop for generations of guests who have stayed at the King and Prince, a 75-year-old gem of a resort, designated on the National Register of Historic Places and a member of Historic Hotels of America. Originally a private dance club, King and Prince served as the social center for the small community of residents and visitors to St. Simons; it has emerged in the 21st century as a modern resort that retains the Southern charm that made it famous. Modern updates include Wi-Fi-equipped guest rooms and the addition of a spa — The Royal Treatment Cottage — where mind and body can find repose via aromatherapy and reflexology. Among the high-tech touches, guests can enjoy a 3-D animated flyover of the resort’s golf course available on the Web.

Guest accommodations range from the Oceanfront Building, where rooms have either a terrace or private balcony, to the historic Main Building, with some tower rooms, cabana rooms and suites with Ocean Views, to the Oleander Building, a separate three-floor retreat just a short walk from the main hotel. The resort also offers two- and three-bedroom beach villas on the ocean. All are beautifully furnished with comfortable beds, sofas or chairs and dressers and armoires.

The health-conscious will appreciate the exercise room, tennis courts and five seaside pools including an indoor pool and a hot tub. While for those who simply enjoy a walk or a bike ride, there are paths along the beach. When the tide is out, the beach itself, with its hard-packed sand, attracts runners, joggers, bikers and strolling couples.

Oceanfront room view

An oceanfront pool

oceanfront room

A room with a view

The King and Prince Golf Course is just a few miles away on the northern tip of the island, offering a great golf exprience, with four spectacular island holes, in a beautiful setting — emerald fairways are nestled within ancient forests and a vast salt marsh.

There are three dining rooms at the hotel, all with oceanfront views, but the most notable is the Delegal Room with its stained glass murals and popular Friday night seafood buffet. Don’t miss the signature shrimp and grits with burgundy gravy, along with maybe a pitcher of white sangria, laden with fruit and perhaps some peach cobbler.

If you’re a history buff and can manage to pull yourself away from the dazzling sunsets and hypnotizing rhythms of the sea, there’s a storied past waiting to be uncovered. The hotel can help arrange tours or provide walking tour maps. Bicycle rental shops are located nearby. Guided trolley tours with often entertaining and always informative narrative provide an overview of this remarkable little island. There is also a museum highlighting St. Simons’ coastal heritage located at the base of the centuries-old St. Simons Island Lighthouse. For history fans, the Maritime Center at the old Coast Guard Station on East Beach is open daily with artifacts and photography from its days as an important training base as well as displays of the area’s ecological systems.

Christ Church, erected in 1884, marks the spot where John and Charles Wesley held services under the oak trees in 1736. Now, the second oldest Episcopal church in Georgia, it is also the third oldest in the country. It is perhaps the most lovely and pastoral of the many sites that make this island, and a stay at this hotel, so memorable.