Posts Tagged ‘St.Simons Island Dining’

Introducing: ECHO Oceanfront Restaurant & Bar

Friday, March 14th, 2014

ECHO Oceanfront Restaurant St Simons Island

 

We are excited to announce that ECHO is now open! Resort Executive Chef, Jason Brumfiel has been hard at work preparing new menus and gearing up for the opening of ECHO Restaurant on St. Simons Island. This new restaurant located at our resort combines casual outdoor oceanfront dining with comfortable indoor seating and a beautiful new ocean view bar. The menu features fresh produce and many local products on the menu. This fun, new restaurant is the perfect place to unwind after work or to meet up with friends on a Saturday night and listen to live music. Whatever the occasion, ECHO is THE place to be! For more information, visit their website.

 

Chicken Dumplings at ECHO Restaurant

Chicken & Dumplings

ECHO Dining Room

The new dining room at ECHO

Flatbread Pizza and Wings at ECHO Restaurant

Enjoy wings or a flatbread pizza by the bar.

ECHO Bar on St Simons Island Georgia

Patrons enjoying our new bar!

The magical allure of St. Simons Island

Thursday, November 1st, 2012

Tom Plant of WINEormous.com has written a series of blogs about his visit and the southern culinary traditions he enjoyed… and he can’t wait to come back!  Global Writes published his latest article about his unforgettable experience.

It’s only been a few months since my visit, but I miss Saint Simons Island, Georgia, tremendously. The majestic King & Prince Beach & Golf Resort was my home for my all too brief visit, and I left feeling officially spoiled.

Let us spoil you!  Call 800-342-0212 today.

Tom Plant’s Culinary Adventures on St. Simons

Wednesday, September 26th, 2012

Low Country Boil at The King and Prince

Tom Plant, of WINEormous.com has written a series of blogs about his spring visit to The King and Prince and St. Simons Island.  He fit quite a few adventures into a three-day trip!

My whirlwind three day visit to Saint Simons Island this past April was drawing to a close. Part of Georgia’s wilderness coast, it’s one of 15 beachfront islands along a 90 mile stretch. We began Wednesday morning with a visit to  a local favorite for lunch and dinner, Palmer’s Village Café. This charming spot is adorned with local art on every wall and the smells are heavenly.

Read this and more of Tom’s great stories here.

 

Return of “Southern Culinary Traditions”

Thursday, September 6th, 2012

Sucheta Rawal, contributing blogger to Cuisine Noir, recently visited The King and Prince Resort and spoke with Chef Jeff Kaplan regarding our Southern Culinary Traditions.  Sucheta also enjoyed our Friday Night Seafood Buffet and Southern Charm Sunday Brunch.

(Chef Jeff) Kaplan believes in cooking with local ingredients and supporting local farmers and businesses. His initiative to bring fresh and seasonal ingredients to the island has completely transformed the menu at the resort. He personally visits the Saint Simons Island Farmer’s Market and picks up produce to cook with, then orchestrates them into a Southern culinary symphony. The dishes are enhanced by locally sourced honey from the Savannah Bee Company, peaches from Lane Southern Orchards, and wild Georgia shrimp from City Market Seafood.

For this and more mouth-watering posts, visit Cuisine Noir.com.

Oceanfront Restaurants on St Simons

Simon Says: You are a Saint

Monday, July 9th, 2012

Elayne Spencer took a recent trip to The King and Prince for fun, food & relaxation.  She wasn’t disappointed!  Read on…  For more of Elayne’s stories, visit www.homeschoolingparent.com

 

Experiencing the history, beauty, tranquility and the food of St. Simons Island

By Elayne Spencer

Part One: In this installment, I am focusing on the food I found while staying on St. Simons Island. In my next installment, I will share with you the historical highlights of the Island, making it a perfect place for a fall field trip.

 

If the coast of Georgia isn’t on your mind as a destination for a family/educational get-away, you’ll want to add it to your list immediately. If you’re trying to work in
an affordable “field trip” for your homeschooling family, fall or early spring are exceptional times to visit the area. The rates are lower than in the summer months, but the days are warm and the nights are cool… perfect weather for exploring all the island has to offer.

Nestled among the coastline and barrier islands of Georgia, Brunswick and the
Golden Isles welcome you to a truly exhilarating expanse of sea, sun, and fun. There is so much do and see! Yet, just relaxing and taking in the beauty of these fabled shores will give you enough wonderful memories to last for years. After experiencing the hospitality and beauty of St. Simons Island, it’s apparent why Georgia stays in the minds of so many, evoking images of open arms and peaceful dreams.

There’s a peaceful, laid-back feel on St. Simons Island. It’s quiet. It’s established. It has many year-round residents. Yet, you feel at home. When you enter restaurants and shops you are treated not as a guest but as a friend. There’s a lack of pretentiousness that personifies the soul of the South.

YUM YUM YUM

And the food? I’m not sure I could find better food. Anywhere.

There are foods that I have not been particularly drawn to in the past. Before I left for this trip, however, I decided to open up my mind (and my palate) and view every culinary exposure as an adventure. I was not disappointed.

After checking in at The King and Prince Resort, the adventure began! At dinner, I was seated next to Vinny D’Agostino, Food & Beverage Director at The King and Prince. Besides having a contagious and delightful sense of fun and adventure, Vinny has an amazing grasp on the nuances of food preparation, history and creation. Throughout the rest of the trip, I stayed close to Vinny and experienced food I’d never been brave enough to try. The first culinary treat was Apalachiacola Oysters on the half shell with sweet corn, asparagus, tomato and cilantro vinaigrette. I planned to pretend I liked the dish, but as it turned out, no acting skills were necessary. It was delectable! No one was more surprised than I. I think Vinny had a napkin handy … just in case.

We were joined by Chef Jeff Kaplan and Bud St. Pierre, Director of Sales and Marketing. Dinner was prepared before our eyes and I never expected to be so smitten with grits! I’d had grits before, but none that rival the ones served to us that night … Wild Georgia Low Country Shrimp and Grits.

I love shrimp prepared any way. Fried, boiled, grilled … you name it. I have eaten shrimp all over the country, but there is something that distinguishes Wild Georgia shrimp from any other shrimp I’ve ever eaten. They’re unusually sweet. According toWild Georgia Shrimp, they have their own unique flavor. The flesh is firm and the color is fresh. Wild Georgia Shrimp grow naturally. According to Monterey Bay Aquarium, “Southeast Asian wetlands, especially mangrove forests, are being destroyed to create commercial shrimp farms. These ponds build up muck which can cause shrimp to have pollutants or disease.” Yuck. There’s none of that muck in this sweet, succulent shrimp.

Chef Kaplan prepared Shrimp and Grits in a Tasso Cream Sauce. If you’d like to try your hand at it, here’s the recipe. I’m pretty sure the addition of asiago cheese is a nod to Vinny’s Italian roots. I’ve never met an Italian spin I didn’t like.

————

King and Prince Shrimp & Grits in a Tasso Cream Sauce Recipe

Ingredients:
1 cup heaving cream
1/3 cup tasso ham
¼ cup kernel corn
¼ cup diced tomatoes
2 tablespoons chopped green onions
½ cup wild Georgia shrimp
1 tablespoon Cajun seasoning
¼ cup asiago cheese
salt and pepper to taste
olive oil

Preparation: In a sauce pan, sauté the Georgia shrimp with Cajun seasoning using olive oil. In another pan, sauté tasso ham, corn, tomatoes, and green onions: add heavy cream and asiago cheese: let simmer two minutes. Add shrimp and serve over stone ground grits of your choice.
————

I could go on and on about the food. (Too late … I think I already have!) We visitedSouthern Soul Barbeque, housed in a converted 1940s gas station. All the smoking is done with wood. Prior to our visit,  Guy Fieri from Food Network’s Diners, Drive-Ins and Dives visited. (Watch here…)

Among our group, we tried nearly every kind of smoked meat on the menu – it was all delicious. My mouth is still watering over the fried green beans. Delicious! Take a look at the menu … it’s so affordable. It’s also gone through its share of challenges and hasrisen from the ashes, so to speak, only a month or so after being visited by Guy.

Tom and Leslie DeLaney

Palmer’s Cafe is an Artist Studio as Well as a Restaurant

 

Heading to the downtown area, we visited Palmer’s Cafe to see Palmer Fortune and his beloved team. I can’t think of a breakfast food I like more than Eggs Benedict. Palmer’s puts a distinctive, southern spin on its version. Their version of Eggs Benedict is fondly called “The Southern.” It is two poached eggs, collards and ham served on an open faced biscuit with homemade ‘pot-licker’ gravy. In place of the usual Canadian Bacon, there was a thick, crispy fried green tomato. I have spent nights awake thinking about that scrumptious tomato. I grew up on fried green tomatoes, but they were nothing like the one I had at Palmer’s. (Sorry, Mom.) Check out their breakfast menu.

Chef Dave Snyder of Halyards surpassed all of our expectations with a sampling of what must have been every single item he serves at his restaurant. Every selection on the menu is prepared fresh – seafood, beef, poultry, game, sauces, soups and sweets. And every single thing is made from scratch. How can you not love a place that hangs its hat on using fresh food and making everything from scratch? While my mouth watered while tasting his luscious the seafood, I have to say … the grilled vegetables were some of the best I’ve ever eaten. Probably because they were fresh … And made from scratch.

And Vinny D’Agostino? Are you reading this? I am waiting on my batch of homemade Limoncello to arrive … It’s been a hot summer here! I need a refreshing treat!

Special thanks to my fellow journalists and Leigh Cort. I look forward to perhaps
crossing paths with all of you again. Maybe a reunion?

MORE PHOTOS BELOW

 

Chef Dave Snyder of Halyards

 

 

It's okay ... we sent him back to the sea after we visited

There’s more than shrimp in that net!

 

 

“The Southern” at Palmer’s Cafe

 

 

Shark attack! Follow Will’s travel adventures http://blogs.gonomad.com/wake-and-wander/

 

 

Chef Snyder’s fresh selection of seafood

13th Colony Distillers – A Delcaration of Drinking Local

Tuesday, May 15th, 2012

The King and Prince is proud to provide Georgia-made 13th Colony vodkas, gins and whiskeys.  Steve Mirsky gives a short history of the distillery, along with tempting flavor descriptions!  Learn more at 13colony.net

13th Colony Liquors: A Declaration of Drinking Local
By: Steve Mirsky   |    Posted on April 11, 2012   |   0 Comments

Up until recently, when folks mentioned liquor from the Southern U.S., whiskey and moonshine immediately sprang to mind. Popularized through aggressive marketing and folklore, images of whiskies like ‘Ole Grand Dad and Jack Daniels are etched into a cultural milieu that also plays up images of  pickup truck driving backwoods individualists.  But of course reality is just a bit more complex and liquor production in what is commonly referred to as “the South”, an area roughly defined by the Mason Dixon Line and the Mississippi as borders, has a rich tradition that’s all too often overshadowed by these preconceived notions.

While it’s true that the South has a tremendously successful history of Bourbon production in Kentucky and Whiskey in Tennessee, recent years have witnessed the rise of a robust craft distillery movement as well. Some uniquely Southern approaches to vodka and other spirits include brands like FireflyCorsair Artisan , and on a more commercial scale,Piedmont Distillery. A newer addition to these craft producers with a growing fan base isThirteenth Colony Distillery in Americus, Georgia.

In 2007, four friends, Alton Darby, Kent Cost, Dr. Gil Klemann and Winford Hines, began distilling homemade vodka for family and friends. This initial foray catapulted their efforts from hobby to business opening their own distillery. Thirteenth Colony now specializes in small batch production of Southern Vodka, Southern Gin, and 100% corn whiskey. Located on top of the South’s oldest and deepest aquifers, their water is super pure…perfect for making fine-quality distilled spirits. Locally grown corn, barley and rye are also used in the process, which unfolds in a custom-designed 250-gallon still.

Thirteenth Colony vodka is aromatic and supremely silky resulting from slow carbon filtration through a 10 foot column filter…perfect for savoring chilled and neat as the Russians do with caviar, such as Walter’s Caviar from Darien, GA making it a totally local experience. Their Southern Gin, bursting with the pungent scent of juniper berries, is best simply enjoyed with tonic water and lime on the rocks. Their signature Corn Whiskey is my favorite derived from a traditional southern recipe aged in vintage oak barrels yielding a robust 95 proof. Each bottle is personally signed and numbered by Thirteenth Colony distiller, Graham Arthur. Dangerously drinkable, its smooth taste is complex on the palate with hints of oak, spice, butter, and sweet corn. ..a perfect pairing for some real Southern Soul food!

First Seating: King and Prince Shows Off On Opening Night

Monday, May 14th, 2012

Will McGough will make you hungry for our Georgia grown ingredients in this post on his Wake and Wander blog!

First Seating: King and Prince Shows Off On Opening Night

Posted on April 19, 2012 by willmcgough

I arrived at the King and Prince Resort on St. Simons (off the coast ofGeorgia) knowing that I would be participating in a Southern Culinary Showcase, but I had no idea they would put on such a performance the first night.

I actually contributed to the meal – I sautéed the shrimp and prepared the pork, tomato, and corn gravy to accompany the grits. In the past, grits was a dish that reminded me of something served at a bad diner, dry and bland, but when the chef passed me the heavy cream, I knew we were officially in the south.

The brand new Executive Chef Jeff Kaplan (he’s been on the island for ten days) and his crew allowed me to have some fun flipping the shrimp, but eventually it was time for me to step aside, let them do their thing. As the courses began to roll out of the kitchen, I was more than happy to get my tail back to the table.

We started with a spread of Artisan cheeses from Sweet Grass Dairy(Thomasville, GA), paired ridiculously well with local honeys and jams – you can’t really beat a well-thought sweet/salt combo (more info and photos to come… I am going to attend a honey tasting later in the trip).

The main course of shrimp and grits was easily the best version I’ve ever had – it was creamy and the Georgia shrimp are naturally sweet (noticeably so compared to shrimp from other regions… more to come on this later as well).

The first course of fresh oysters stole the show in terms of creativity – they were served with sweet corn and asparagus. Again, the traditional salty-sea taste of the oysters combined with the burst of sweetness in the corn jumped off my palate, and the crunch of the asparagus provided the texture (a good way for first timers to get over the “sliminess” of oysters).

One of the great things I’m realizing about Georgia is the pleasant balance in its signature fare. For every Southern-style comfort dish with heavy cream, there’s a piece of fish or a fresh peach providing a light complement/alternative.

Or you can say screw it – you’re on vacation – and toss the peaches into a crème brulee. What I said about my experience in St. Barths also applies to this version of the classic dessert (see photo):

Had I been in a room by myself, my tongue would have been on the dish.

First two photos courtesy of Desiree Miller:

 

 

 


Apalachicola oysters with sweet corn, asparagus, tomato, cilantro vinaigrette.


Blackberry sorbet with blackberry liqueur (palate cleanser).

 

The King and Prince’s Newly Restored Pools

Monday, March 26th, 2012

We are excited to announce the opening of our new state-of-the-art luxurious oceanfront pools!  All through the winter, the pools were renovated and we have been anxiously awaiting the finished product.  Along with the pools, we have opened the Ocean Terrace Grille for a true oceanfront dining experience.  The terrace, just steps away from the ocean, is an ultra casual dining option.

Michael Johnson, Vice-President of Resort Operations, states “The staff of our Resort has been anticipating the unveiling of this spectacular pool complex renewal for many months. We are all thrilled with the results created by our designers and landscaping artisans. Excitement is high as we eagerly await our Spring and Summer guests’ arrival, anticipating their desires whatever their age.”

The new pool complex includes three unique pool offerings surrounded by various seating options for swimmers, readers and water spectators. It will tempt all of the senses with well designed amenities:

  • Sound – ambient music system that allows guests to also enjoy the waves crashing beyond the Hotel’s sea wall
  • Smell – landscaping that embraces aromatic flowers and indigenous plantings
  • Sight – broad open sightlines for pool guests and guestrooms around the deck
  • Touch – contemporary new finishes throughout the deck, pool and outdoor seating
  • Taste – the new Ocean Terrace Grille offers a refreshing menu of Southern culinary traditions

This past weekend we had our fist visitors to the complex and they loved it!

The first children jumping in the new pool!

 

Simon & Sam, the first swimmers

 

Sundeck

 

Lounge Chairs under Pergola

 

Lounge Chairs by Pool

 

Children’s Wading Pool

 

Sandbox

 

Oval Pool

 

Kids in Wading Pool

 

Deck overlooking the beach

 

Ocean Terrace Grille

 

Ocean Terrace Grille

 

Pools

 

King and Prince Shrimp & Grits in Tasso Cream Sauce

Tuesday, December 13th, 2011

Marc d’Entremont writes an article at Suite101 about his visit to The King and Prince Resort and eating their Shrimp & Grits, a Southern Culinary Tradition.

King and Prince Resort’s Shrimp and Grits in a Tasso Cream Sauce

The King & Prince Beach & Golf Resort, St. Simons Island, GA, finesses a classic dish served in every southern dinner elevating Shrimp and Grits to stardom.
 

 

Shrimp & Grits in a Tasso Cream Sauce- Marc d’Entremont

It was the end of a pleasant sunny early November day in the now quiet off-season of St. Simons Island, one of Georgia’s premier barrier island destinations. The elegant 1935 King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort , listed on the National Historic Register and Historic Hotels of America, set a table befitting its Old World heritage. The formal place settings with an array of flatware and crystal stemware lay on starched white linen lit by softly glowing candles. The guests are not what the media would identify as royalty or even VIPs. We’re nearly two dozen jaded, or nearly jaded, travel and food journalists – critics to the core.

 

Southern Culinary Traditions

We were the guests of The King and Prince. Our four day tour to explore the culinary traditions of southeastern Georgia was organized by Leigh Cort Publicity. Such media trips involve a considerable amount of activity, not the least of which is eating and drinking. To make an impression worthy of an article the fare has to be more than just free.

Tradition versus an Old Standby

Personally my foodie radar was picking up more an old diner standby rather than a fine tradition when the itinerary indicated that dinner would include a Shrimp and Grits cooking demonstration. Google any of a dozen recipes and discover everything from bullion cubes to extra sharp cheddar used to mask tasteless farm raised frozen shrimp mounded on top of instant grits. Believe me I’ve had my full of disappointing versions.

Chef Dwayne Austell and Vinny D’Agostino

It took only a moment after entering the dining room for my nose to detect a subtle aroma of warm smoked meat. It was emanating from the chafing dish that was keeping the sauce at serving temperature. I should have guessed that a Johnson & Wales University graduate, Vinny D’Agostino, Food and Beverage Director, and Georgia Low Country native Sous Chef Dwayne Austell would rise above the ordinary.

Wild Shrimp and Tasso Ham

Quality ingredients are essential for a great dish and there is no comparison between farm raised and wild shrimp. Fortunately, much of America’s shrimp is wild and the package will be labeled appropriately. The high tides and lush nutrient rich salt marshes of low country and barrier islands provide an excellent clean environment for Georgia’s abundant shrimp. The Georgia White Shrimp is especially plump, meaty and flavorful. Yet the secret to Chef Austell’s outstanding Shrimp and Grits is the addition of smoky, cured Tasso ham – an essential ingredient in much of southern cajun cuisine. What is actually a pork butt rather than a ham gives the cajun spiced light cream sauce a rich flavor that lingers in the mouth.

The Recipe – for 2 servings

Ingredients:

  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 2/3rd cup diced Tasso ham
  • 1/2 cup fresh or frozen kernel corn
  • 1/2 cup seeded diced tomatoes
  • 4 Tablespoons diced green onions
  • 4 to 6 ounces fresh shelled wild shrimp
  • 2 Tablespoons cajun seasoning mix
  • 1/2 cup grated asiago cheese
  • salt and pepper to taste
  • olive oil
  • cooked grits

Preparation:

  1. First prepare grits using the best recipe I know for Creamy Stone Ground Grits
  2. Add just enough olive oil to lightly cover the bottom of two saute pans and heat over medium setting.
  3. In one pan add the shrimp and cajun seasoning. Saute no more than 5 minutes. Overcooking results in tough shrimp.
  4. In the second pan add the ham and corn and saute for a couple minutes. Add the tomatoes and green onions, combine and saute a few minutes more. Add the heavy cream and asiago cheese. Bring to a simmer and cook for two minutes.
  5. Combine the shrimp and all the pan juices into the sauce.
  6. Serve over the prepared grits.

Wine Pairing

Vinny D’Agostino, a sommelier as well, paired the entree with a nice Georgia Chardonnay from Frogtown Cellars. The minimal acidity of a Chardonnay, preferably unoaked, works well with the creamy sauce. A California or Washington State Chardonnay would be a fine substitute since Georgia wines are not widely distributed.

Even if you’re not dining a few hundred feet from the ocean, this fine recipe from the King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort can conjure memories of warm lazy days under oak trees dripping with Spanish Moss and sea gulls laughing overhead.

Georgia Made, Georgia Grown

Tuesday, November 15th, 2011

Last week The King and Prince hosted an event for food writers featuring Georgia grown food.  We invited ten vendors from around Georgia to speak about their products.  It was a wonderful experience for all that participated.  We learned the history behind the product and the means of production, but also what led each speaker to the industry. They even brought samples for everyone to try!

1. Flat Creek Lodge- Make their own traditional aritsan cheeses and much more.  They have won numerous awards in cheese competitions throughout the country and it is made in Swainsboro, Georiga.

2. Thirteenth Colony Distilleries- Georgia’s only craft distillery.  Their products are Plantation Vodka, Southern Gin, Southern Vodka and Southern Corn Whiskey. They also demonstrated delicious cocktails with their hand crafted spirits.

3. Savannah Bee- Beekeeper and owner Ted Dennard has been keeping bees since he was a child.  He talked about his passion for honey and how he launched his business.  Not only do they make pure delicious honey, but they also have a body care line including hand cream, soaps and lip balms made from honey!

4. Georgia Olive Growers- The attendees of the event had the pleasure of tasting olive oil from the first olive pressing in Georgia.  This is the first harvest of olives on the east coast since the 1800s.

5. Lane Southern Orchards- They have been growing peaches for over a hundred years and have 2,500 acres of peach orchards! We learned all about harvesting peaches.

6. Sugar Marsh Cottage- Gourmet sweets and specialty confections made 30 minutes from St. Simons in Darien.

7. Still Pond Winery- They produce eleven types of Muscadine Wines.  We learned about the health benefits of these wonderful wines.

8. Vidalia Onion- “America’s favorite sweet onion,” a crop that orginated in Georgia during the depression.

9. Wild Georgia Shrimp- Along with a sampling of shrimp, we heard about shrimping history, what makes the wild Georgia shrimp taste so good and why wild shrimp are better than farm raised shrimp.

10. St. Simons Sweets- A local sweets store right here on St. Simons makes their own sweets.  We learned about the history of Georgia pecans.

Olive Tea Brewing

Honeycomb

Low Country Boil with Crab & Wild Georgia Shrimp

As a part of our goal to transform to ”Farm to Table” products in our Restaurant, we plan to highlight each of these Georgia products in our Restaurant for a week in the upcoming months.

*Photos courtesy of Christine & G.W. Tibbetts