Posts Tagged ‘St. Simons Island Activities’

Say ‘I Do’ to Oceanfront Fun on St. Simons Island, Georgia

Friday, February 28th, 2014
Celebrate your wedding on the beach on St. Simons Island!

Celebrate your wedding on the beach on St. Simons Island!

Few wedding venues tout the beauty, southern hospitality and variety of oceanfront activities as St. Simons Island, Georgia. Flaunting breathtaking views of the Atlantic Coast, brides and grooms discover that’s there’s no shortage of places to exchange vows and things to do around the island.

St. Simons Island itself is small with a laid-back atmosphere, but boasts a variety of activities for everyone: massages, boat tours, golfing, shopping, art galleries, gourmet dining and much more. When inviting guests to a destination wedding, why not make it a vacation for them too?

Brides and grooms may charter different boat tours around St. Simons Island. From dolphin gazing, fishing to other water sports, there’s an Atlantic Ocean expedition to suit almost every seafaring appetite. Or charter a trolley and check out the scenery of the island and its rich history.

Along the St. Simons Island pier, a slew of restaurants, boutiques and other places of interest comprise the historical town. Enchanting landmarks such as the St. Simons Island’s lighthouse, the Coastal Maritime Center and Fort Frederica convey a compelling account on the area’s place in American history.

There are a variety of places to get married on the island, such as the romantic and picturesque Christ Church. The King and Prince Resort provides the perfect spot for a reception plus gives your guests an amazing getaway experience. Our expansive beachfront provides everyone with a prime spot to bask in the sun and enjoy the ocean views. Several swimming pools, dual tennis courts, massages and our oceanfront restaurant specializing in seasonal, farm-to-table dishes will make this an occasion that all of your guests will remember!

Christ Church

Christ Church on St. Simons Island, Georgia.

southern wedding

Spanish moss as a breathtaking backdrop.

Off the Beaten Path

Tuesday, February 5th, 2013

A born and bred New Yorker, Mosaka Williamson was not sure what to expect on her sojourn through Georgia.  She could only spend one night with us, but the quaint charms of our island left her hungry for more!  We are honored to be featured on her blog, Socially Superlative.

The vibe of the resort in true Southern fashion is very  laid back. Many people go there just for the simple pleasures of walking on the beach or exploring in the Pier Village, where there are several shops, restaurants and a fishing pier. However, the resort is surrounded by many fun and interesting recreational activities, historic sites, and attractions that offer something for everyone.

We’re glad we could host “Mo” and her friends for a dash of southern hospitality and a chance to kick back and relax on their press trip.

Main pool complex at The King and Prince

Steep Climb to a Spectacular View

Monday, January 14th, 2013

Annette White has delighted us with many entertaining posts on her blog, Bucket List Journey.  One bucket list item that she needed to check off was a climb to the top of a lighthouse.  Perfect!  St. Simons Island is home to a fully functioning lighthouse, built in 1872.  129 steps up a cast iron spiral stairway led Annette to some glorious views.  This magnificent piece of history is located about a mile south of The King and Prince Resort – great stop for a bike ride!

Read more about Annette’s journey in her blog post, Climbing a St. Simons Island Lighthouse.

St Simons Island Lighthouse

St. Simons Island Lighthouse

BBQ and a Bike Ride – a Southern Island Adventure!

Wednesday, December 5th, 2012

Annette White visited us recently, and she nixed the idea of R&R on her free time, opting instead for a beach bike ride.  She also walked a block away from the resort to the scrumptious Beachcomber BBQ for dinner one night – complete with red wine in a plastic cup!

Read on, and we dare you to not feel the beach breeze and taste the tangy BBQ…

 

The King and Prince Shines in Southern Food Festivals

Thursday, October 11th, 2012

The King and Prince culinary staff has had a busy September!  The kitchen buzzed with activity through the constant flow of fall travelers, conventions, weddings and other gatherings.  In addition, they had the pleasure of participating in two local festivals – the Shrimp and Grits Festival and the inaugural St. Simons Food & Spirits Festival.

On the Friday night of the Shrimp & Grits festival, our staff worked tirelessly to prepare one of our signature dishes for the voting masses.  Their hard work paid off when we won the People’s Choice award for Best Vendor!

On the next weekend, Chef Jeff and his team showcased several delicious treats, including Cajun Wild Georgia Shrimp Skewers on Sweet Corn Salsa, for the St. Simons Food & Spirits Festival.

This Festival, whose proceeds went to benefit  Hospice of the Golden Isles, asked our own Food & Beverage Director Vinny D’Agostino to be their master mixologist.  With the help of our talented bartenders, Vinny introduced festival goers to our signature cocktails, featuring 13th Colony Southern Corn Whisky, among others.

We can hardly wait until next year!

Legend surrounds you…

Wednesday, July 11th, 2012

Legend surrounds you…

When you are embraced by the majesty of the Tower Room, or open your balcony door, you will feel as if you’re on top of the world; you can almost sense the legends and hear the past. By being in the King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort, you stand in the middle of history. You can imagine those first visitors in 1935 as they came in droves to enjoy the seaside dance club; you will sense the feel the pride and loyalty when, in the 1940s, the King and Prince served as a naval coast-watching and training facility during World War II.

And when you step outside the next day, after an amazing breakfast at The King’s Tavern, you can hop on the St. Simon’s Trolley and head to the historic Lighthouse. You can embark on a tour that will bring you into the intriguing and mystical Christ Church, which traces its origins all the way back to 1776. The magnificent wooded grounds enclose a cemetery of the earliest settlers to St. Simon’s – settlers that have tales to tell of battles, life and love. Then on to Fort Frederica for a history lesson to the extreme, where you will learn the monumental place this island holds in American history. From outdoor activities to the numerous unique shops and art galleries, a tour of St. Simons is an experience you will want for days on end.

Kindness surrounds you…

With a staff of amazing, friendly people who wish nothing more than for you to have the vacation of a lifetime, you will be constantly pampered. From massages in our Royal Treatment Cottage to relaxing with coffee in the elegant atrium lobby before heading out for the Friday Evening Seafood Buffet in the oceanfront Delegal Room - the historic centerpiece of the Resort – featuring original stained glass panoramas depicting scenes from St. Simons rich history and the beautiful Atlantic Ocean…the King and Prince staff offers nothing but warmth and charm.

THIS is Artistry!

Sunrise on St. Simons Island

St Simons Island Sunrise

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Why You Should Visit St. Simons Island

Tuesday, July 3rd, 2012

Claudine Williams visited us last April.  Here’s what she has to say about her getaway on TripWolf.com

I drove through a dozen small towns to get from Atlanta  to the coast of Georgia. At first, I thought the towns were quaint pit-stops along miles and miles of road. Sometimes I’d see horses grazing on land along the two-lane highway. I kept thinking that there had to be a faster route to St. Simons Island. Couldn’t I take I-95 there? I barely saw any cars on the road as I trudged along at 45 miles per hour. I was tempted to go faster, but I knew that Georgia cops were nothing to play with.

I was to stay in the King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort. I had been grinding, putting in 16+ hour days writing, dealing with deadlines. At night, I usually fell asleep with my laptop on my bed, so I was more than ready to see what St. Simons Island and the King and Prince had to offer.

The King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort

The King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort

A Family-Friendly Island

St. Simons is a laid-back island with a family-friendly vibe. There are no high-rises on the island, just plenty of shopping centers, restaurants, homes, a couple of golf courses, parks, and the beach. Unlike most beach communities, the majority of the people there are year-round residents. When the weather’s warm, residents head to the ocean for little rest and recreation. They meet under the trees in Neptune Park, the public park. The park has a playground, miniature golf, and a  pool. It is one the top hang-out spots in St. Simons. The cute shopping and entertainment district is the other hot-spot.

 

Shopping district on St. Simons Island

Shopping district on St. Simons Island

Lucky for me, island’s popular King and Prince resort is also near the ocean. I knew that I was getting closer to the resort when I saw a  golf cart driving down road. My room was not ready when I arrived at the hotel, but the first desk personnel offered to call my cell phone when it was all set.

King and Prince Resort and Spa

View from an oceanview room at the King and Prince Resort and Spa

A few minutes later, I moved into an oceanfront room with a king-sized bed. I opened the sliding glass doors and looked out at the pool and beyond at the ocean. The view was glorious, and so was the ocean breeze.

Touring St. Simons by Trolley

My car safely parked in the resort’s free lot, I took a trolley tour of the island, a cool way to see what the island is all about. With the windows wide open and a breeze blowing, we drove under massive canopy trees that reminded me of the Old South, ladies with parasols and gloved hands. Actually, people who love history would probably enjoy the trolley tour. The tour takes visitors to points of interest like the maritime center, the old lighthouse, and Bloody Marsh Battle site, the site of a 1700s battle between the British and Spaniards.

Maritime Center on St. Simons Island

We explored the island’s history at the Maritime Center

Seafood lovers would love the plentiful seafood at the island’s many restaurants. Shrimping and fishing are popular pastimes. I rode on the Lady Jane, a shrimping boat, and I felt just like Bubba from Forest Gump. I happen to love shrimp, so I was happy to learn that the shrimping industry is alive and well in Georgia.

A shrimp net from off the Georgia Coast

We went shrimping off of the Georgia coast

 

Before lunch at Haylards Restaurant, Chef Dave Snyder showed off a recent catch.

 

One Visit and You’re Hooked

When I think of the plentiful  seafood and the peaceful living on St. Simons Island, I want to hop in my car and take another trip to the island. The next time I visit, I’ll make sure that I take the Interstate to get there faster.

Fishing on St. Simon's Island

Cap Fendig demonstrates fishing techniques.

 

St. Simons Island

The easy life on St. Simons Island in Georgia

Family Travel: The King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort on St. Simons Island Family Activities

Thursday, May 17th, 2012

Summer is just around the corner and it’s time to start planning your family vacation!  Alicia Hagan celebrates our Family Friendly atmosphere on her blog, The Mommy Insider

Family Travel: The King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort on St. Simons Island Family Activities

APRIL 16, 2012 · 1 COMMENT IN NEW POSTS,TRAVEL

For the next few days I am enjoying a stay at The King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort.   Located on St. Simons Island off the coast of Georgia, this beautiful island is ranked as one of the top 10 in the country. With family-friendly adventures and amenities, there’s a potential to create many memories while visiting this island.  The King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort is on the list of historic places register in the United States.

The King and Prince Beach and Gold Resort

 

I’m looking forward to going shrimping aboard the “Lady Jane” with Captain Larry CreedleWednesday. Besides going shrimping on an authentic shrimp boat for the first time, I will learn about fishing ecology, which my 12-year-old son will appreciate learning about once I get home.  He loves anything to do with fishing so he’ll be thrilled to learn about shrimping.

Here is a brief overview of what The King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort and St Simons Island, GA has to offer.

Coastal Outdoor Adventure Camps 

This camping adventure strives to teach children how to appreciate nature, how to fish and how to swim. With a different theme every registration date, the Coastal Outdoor Adventure Camp is a family fun part of The King and Prince Beach Resort. There are multiple registration dates throughout the year, so that you can coordinate them with your vacation.Read more about Coastal Outdoor Adventure Camps here.

The King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort pool and sandbox

Resort Activities

From yoga classes to swimming, there are dozens of options for families at this resort. There is a special activity coordinator that can help your group develop a schedule of child-friendly adventures.  Learn more about King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort activities here.

The King and Prince - St Simons Island


Bike Trails 

The King and Prince Resort is filled with beautiful forests and coastal shorelines. You canrent a bike from local bike shop, Ocean Motion, and take one of the scenic bike trails through certain parts of the island. The real point of interest is that your family can rent a bike called a surrey, which holds up to 9 people. It’s an amazing opportunity to bond with your family while exploring nature on vacation.

The King and Prince Resort doesn’t disappoint!

Explore the Golden Isle of St. Simons

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

A great article by Carolyn Burns Bass posted in Greer’s OC about The King and Prince Resort and what to see and do on St. Simons Island.

Explore the Golden Isle of St. Simons

01.20.12

Review by Carolyn Burns Bass

It’s not hard to understand why this stretch of the Georgia coast is known as the Golden Isles. Miles of marsh grass wave in the breeze, carved by streams, rivers, and inlets to form a jigsaw puzzle of islands. The sun rises like a glittering coin over the Atlantic and blankets the marshlands in gold and amber as it sets over the isles. Poised on the mouth of the sound leading up to the bustling port city of Brunswick, is St. Simons Island, the largest of Georgia’s Golden Isles.

The Spanish named the island and the sound after a Catholic saint during 16th century exploration of the Southeastern coastline. You can see Spanish influences throughout the region, including the architecture. Mediterranean arches, turrets, clay tiles and stucco make haunting backdrops for the Spanish moss dripping off the massive trees overarching the buildings and lining the streets and lanes. The island has maintained its quaint seaside charm through decades of development in the islands and cities surrounding this wild island treasure.

The King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort

The jewel of this golden isle is the King and Prince Beach and Golf Resort. Perched on the white sandy shore near the mouth of St. Simons Sound, this historic hotel offers panoramic views of the Atlantic Ocean and the coastline stretching north and south. Built in 1935 as a private dance club for the well-heeled of the area, it added lodging to its original structure in 1941 and opened to the public as a hotel. There was nothing as magnificent as The King and Prince anywhere along the Southeast coast when it was built and even today it rises above many of the cookie-cutter resorts now dotting the coast and the Isles.

A spacious, bright and airy lobby greets you from the main entry of the King and Prince. You can see the Mediterranean design in the arches that line the coastal stretch of the lobby interior. Natural wood bannisters, trim and ceiling beams encasing dark embossed tin tiles add warmth to the lobby’s light interior. Just beyond the reception desk is a fountain, surrounded by palms, lush greenery and flowers, and an indoor pool and whirlpool (one of five pools located throughout the resort).

Guests at the King and Prince have a deluxe array of choices in room types to meet budget or family needs. Oceanfront rooms in the historic building are only steps from the beach, with spacious bathrooms and separate sitting areas. Luxury amenities such as in-room Keurig coffee stations, Bath & Body Works toiletries, and large flat screen televisions are standard in every room. Stretching beyond the historic main building are the Beach Villas. These roomy accommodations offer two- or three-bedroom apartment size villas with master bedrooms, full kitchens, dining areas and private patios or balconies.

Stepping up the game in privacy and luxury at the King and Prince are the Residences, which comprise of six individual houses spread throughout the resort to include quaint beach cottages and even executive-level houses with ample meeting and entertaining areas (with as many as five bedrooms!).

Scenic and Challenging Golf

Competing with beach and ocean activities on St. Simons Island are the resort’s tennis courts, pools and golf course. While the formal name of the King and Prince includes “golf resort,” the greens are actually a bit of a drive to the northern-most end of the island. Known as the Hampton Club, this golf course shuttles hotel guests straught to the course for a day of golf among the salt marshes, swampy lagoons, towering palmettos and grand oaks draped with Spanish moss.

The course was renovated in 2009 with renewal in turf and design enhancements to the original 18-hole, 72-par design. Four of the holes sit upon individual marsh islands accessible by elevated cart bridges, making for challenging play. Practice areas include a driving range, putting green and a chipping green, and golfers can grab lunch or post game cocktails in the roomy clubhouse. You can take a virtual flyover of the entire course from the resort’s website for an overview of this distinctive course.

Georgia Coastal Cuisine at its Finest

Director of food and beverage, Vinny D’Agostino, revitalized the King and Prince’s food culture when he joined the staff in May 2011. A master sommelier and culinary arts graduate from Johnson and Wales University, D’Agostino brought more than two decades of creative culinary experience from some of the nation’s top hotels and restaurants. Food was the centerpiece of D’Agostino’s large Italian family, inspiring his passion for taste, texture and temptation, and it shows in everything he prepares or directs. Be sure to try D’Agostino’s signature shrimp and grits, made with Georgia’s wild white shrimp and Tasso ham in a spicy cream sauce that wraps the tongue in savory delight.

The King and Prince is renowned throughout the Golden Isles for its Friday night seafood buffet and its sumptuous Sunday brunch. Set in the resort’s Delegal room, the Friday night seafood buffet features various preparations of the region’s distinctive wild white shrimp, plus platters of crab legs, chilled and steamed; oysters, both fried and on the half-shell; clams and mussels, along with entrees of salmon, catfish, tilapia, sole, grouper and other chef selections. Sunday brunch includes an omelet bar, plus a wide variety of southern comfort foods such as grits, plain, creamy with cheese, or spiced to delight with shrimp; smoked BBQ ribs; buttermilk fried chicken; succulent pot roast and gravy, crispy fried catfish and plenty of other chef surprises.

The Delegal room itself is a thing of beauty. Commanding the eye is the view of the Atlantic from the windows lining the oceanfront wall. Set above the oceanfront windows and around the entire room are eleven spectacular stained glass windows depicting the history of St. Simons island.

Additional dining choices at the King and Prince include the King’s Tavern set in the hotel’s turret lined with oceanfront windows for stunning ocean views, the Atrium Café where snacks and refreshments, along with barista-prepared coffees and teas are served, plus the seasonal (March through October) Paradise Beach Bar and Grill located beachside with casual fare and cocktail service.

More to Do and See On St. Simons

Guests not getting enough exercise running or strolling along the beach, bicycling through town, or browsing through the myriad shops on St. Simons, have free access to treadmills, ellipticals, free weights, and exercise balls in the fitness facility next to the tennis courts.

Set only steps away from the beach guests may rejuvenate body and soul in the Royal Treatment Cottage, an intimate retreat house with a full menu of massage therapies. Lunch can be ordered from the concierge and enjoyed in the quiet of the cottage.

Out and about in St. Simons you’ll find boutiques and souvenir stores, coffeehouses and cafes, candy stores and cocktail happy hours. You can rent a bicycle at Ocean Motion (walking distance from the King and Prince) and pedal around the Island’s 21 miles winding bike paths.

Hop on the Lighthouse Trolley for a guided tour of St. Simons island. The trolley can take you from the Coast Guard station, now a Maritime Museum with history of the island–including its fascinating mission as a coast watching and training facility during WWII–to the working lighthouse; to the picturesque Christ Church, the first English church in Georgia; around town and through the moss-lined lanes from the north end to the south. If you’re lucky to get Cap Fielding as your trolley guide, you’re in for a treat with his arcane knowledge of the region’s colorful history.

On the Water Excitement

Travelers seeking new experiences can get thrills and chills from a shrimping trip on the waters off St. Simons island on The Lady Jane, a former working shrimp boat now USCG certified to carry passengers. The Lady Jane, run by Captain Larry Credle, is an educational and tourism expedition not to be missed.

Guests board The Lady Jane in nearby Brunswick, then head into the waters of St. Simons Sound. Once clear of the marshes, Captain Credle drops his shrimp net and trawls until he figures he’s got a good catch. The net drips with surprise when lifted, then released on the ship’s sorting deck. All hands aboard have a chance to sort the treasures in the net, the jewel of the catch being the wild white Georgia shrimp. It’s not unusual for the net to bring up stingrays, puffer fish, several varieties of flounder, shrimp and crab—including the distinctive horseshoe crabs–plus beautiful whelks. A naturalist on board identifies the different fish in the catch, including the occasional catch of a loggerhead sea turtle. When turtles are caught, they are weighed, measured, and photographed, then released. The details are sent to the Georgia Department of Wildlife and Fisheries.

Everything but the wild white shrimp is released back into the sea. While cruising back to harbor on The Lady Jane, a shipmate cleans and shells the shrimp, then serves it fresh on a platter with homemade cocktail sauce and lemon. Seafood doesn’t get fresher than this.

Getting to St. Simons Island

St. Simons Island is easily accessible from international airports at Savannah/Hilton Head to the north and Jacksonville to the south, while Delta brings in three flights a day to nearby Brunswick Golden Isles Airport.

The King and Prince Beach & Golf Resort, 201 Arnold Rd., St. Simons Island, GA 31522, 912-638-3631, www.kingandprince.com.

TibbettsTravel: King and Prince

Tuesday, January 3rd, 2012

Read below to see Christine Tibbetts’ article from TibbettsTravel about exploring St. Simons and activities and The King and Prince Resort & Golf Course.

King and Prince: A forward-looking resort with history on St. Simons Island

Sunday, December 11, 2011

By Christine Tibbetts

ST. SIMONS, Georgia — Elegance and longevity. Fresh new cuisine wrapping around 76 years of resort history on a barrier island that began forming 200 million years ago.

Grand combination for a holiday at the King and Prince beach and golf resort on St. Simons Island.

Some pleasant places are only fancy; this one has depth too, and neighbors who stay. Here’s how that translates to tourists.

Long-time pleasures keep on happening but change filters in, everything hand-in-hand on this handsome property and throughout the barrier island.

For example: the King and Prince has long served peach cobbler for breakfast. Tradition continues. Now they’re also squeezing juice from their courtyard grapefruit trees for a Prohibition cocktail reflecting one of their historic eras.

Seven decades of menus and history with more in the making.

Well-balanced spirits are only one passion of the new King and Prince cuisine director. Fresh Georgia foods are too, and wines from near and far.

Vinny D’Agostino is his name, steeped in the flavors of his Italian family and schooled at Johnson and Wales College of Culinary Arts in Providence, Rhode Island and North Miami.

A member of the Court of Master Sommeliers, D’Agostino holds a string of accolades from Bon Appetit and Food and Wine magazines for restaurants and bars he’s owned and operated.

Wild Georgia shrimp join many King and Prince menu items including this low country boil accented with olive branches from Georgia Olive Farms in Lakeland

He speaks as easily of his time as a youth on family farms and vineyards in Fornelli, Italy as he does now about the wonders of wild Georgia shrimp.

“Food and drink,” D’Agostino says, “are tied to the history of place in so many significant ways.  Our menus reflect that, and our chefs incorporate their Island family histories along with their professional training.”

Fine eating happens often, at the resort and around the island. In between meals, I listened to local stories on the Lighthouse Trolley, first-person tales since the owner/driver Cap Fendig hails from a family arriving here in the 1800s.

When I’m getting local history from someone whose granddaughter goes to the same elementary school he did, plus his grandfather, I feel grounded.

St. Simons Island is a different experience from resorts with passing-through, seasonal workers.

This bit of the Georgia coast has more residents than visitors:  65 percent full time, Fendig said.

Everyone I talked to loves the tidal marshes, maritime forests, freshwater sloughs and the spartina sugar cane grasses that make local shrimp sweet. They gather at Neptune Park, which visitors do too, so mixing it up is an easy pleasure.

There’s a pier for fishing and gazing and a smooth brick walkway hugging the water, leading to the lighthouse. Talk to Curt Smith; he’s the modern executive version of a light station keeper and an enthusiastic St. Simons Island historian.

Picnic tables and trees galore make Neptune Park a lingering place; for $7.00 get an all-day pass to the big swimming pool.

I walked the bricks twice after way too much breakfast at Sandcastle Café.

Tidal marshes are incubators for so many species that this Georgia coast is one of the 20 most diverse in the world.

That where Tim and Melissa Wellford have been serving legendary eggs, muffins, grits with or without shrimp, French toast, sausage, bacon and more for 24 years.

This is yet another St. Simons Island kind of place to share good conversation with residents.

Local people seem honored to live on a barrier island; Fendig says only two percent of the world’s coasts have barrier islands. Made me feel like a new frontier explorer.

Georgia has 15 barrier islands; four are auto accessible. Good idea to be OK with bridges when you go. 1924 was the first year St. Simons was connected by a causeway to the mainland.

Short and wide is the nature of these islands; North Carolina’s Outer Banks are long and ribbon-like.

Curious facts like that are easy to pick up at the Coast Guard Maritime Museum, a handsome Colonial Revival style structure, one of 80 built as WPA projects.

Definitely watch the documentary to understand the territory; National Geographic says this coast is one of the 20 most diverse in the world.  Museum exhibits are clear and clean, not too much reading, good graphics.

The Coast Guard Station turned Maritime Center features clear, concise, handsome exhibits, about St. Simons Island ecosystems and history.

One section pinpoints a different kind of amazing history: World War II right off this coast. German subs targeting the beaches. Two oil tankers sank.  Dogs trained as defense partners for sentry guards.

Then return to the King and Prince with a different eye knowing today’s elegant pale yellow resort became a radar training school.

The hotel opened to the public July 2, 1941 and in the winter of 1942 was reserved solely for the U.S. Navy and the war effort.

This was the gathering place for families learning their sailor had died because nearby Jacksonville, Fla. was the military point of return.

Looking up in the former ballroom to stained glass window scenes installed in 1938 when this was a private club, and looking out to the Atlantic Ocean, I mused about that war effort, and ours today.

King and Prince staff seem well versed in that history, and proud to be part of a place that sacrificed for the nation. My musing? Who is sharing any thing or any place today? Only our troops?

Travel takes my heart and soul to new places. Then the opportunity is

Shrimp and grits recipe at the King and Prince: long tradition using local wild Georgia shrimp.

mine to act on the thoughts the journeys trigger.

Lighter thoughts swirled in the ballroom too, wishing the King and Prince would reinstitute dancing dominant there decades ago.

My New Jersey parents waltzed often at the nearby Cloister Hotel on Sea Island but I found a gentler, more personable charm at the King and Prince.

Elegance to enjoy, exquisite details shared with pleasure seem the formula here. Bud St. Pierre has directed the sales and marketing for 10 years, happy he and his wife are raising young sons on this barrier island.

“We hire nice people here,” he said with almost a giggle. And I observed hotel and resort staff treating each other like they thought so too.

Many choices at the King and Prince for where to rest starting with oceanfront suites, villas, towers and rooms with balconies overlooking the tennis courts.

G.W. and I stayed in the luxurious Tabby House, a separate structure with space to share and a kitchen; could have brought some of the family.

The Meadows is also a stand-alone house, this one rich with fine and folk art and lots of levels and stairways.

Allow sufficient time when you reserve accommodations to savor the options.

Allow time, too, to explore the tidal waters on the Lady Jane. She’s an eco boat, gathering detailed information to provide the Department of Natural Resources.
Up came the 20-foot-wide net and into a waist high table went the contents

“I never met a blue crab that wasn’t angry,” says Clifford Credle, naturalist on the Lady Jane shrimp boat in waters near Brunswick.

twice on my morning cruise.

Look fast because back into the water is the mission, tallying life and returning to nature.

Exceptional catches require measuring, like the green sea turtle weighing 30 pounds that surprised Clifford Credle, my 18-year-old eco guide who started learning the estuary life when he was nine with his dad Larry who captains this vessel.

Wild Georgia shrimp caught in this net don’t go back to sea; they’re cooked five minutes later and served to Lady Jane passengers.

A King and Prince holiday merges easily with St. Simons Island discoveries, not always the case with resort vacations. Sometimes they lock you in, or so it feels. Isolated.

I think I figured out the difference. King and Prince personnel really live on this island. I kept seeing them in community places as well as the hotel and grounds.

Even food and beverage director Vinny. Saw him, chowing down on ribs and Brunswick stew at Southern Soul BBQ.  Good sign I thought, the pile of local oak in the front yard. Separate smokers for each kind of meat.

Four holes on the Hampton Club course involve the marshes, carefully constructed and monitored to respect and preserve this ecosystem.

I’m no golfer but the King and Prince’s Hampton Club gave me hope.  Most encouraging lesson I’ve ever had was with General Manager and Head Pro Rick Mattox.

He just received a major PGA award for outstanding integrity, charity, mentoring and service to community.  Golfers would recognize the Bill Strabaugh award name.

For real golfers, this course features four holes playing through the marsh, built and maintained with strict regulations, Mattox says. Marsh golf is not to be found anywhere else.

Wannabe golfers like me have a good chance of being allowed to borrow a cart in the late afternoon and experience the beauty of greens and marsh.  The view stretches forever.

Driving to the Hampton Club offers a chance to see island ecosystems, and to visit at least three historic sites: Fort Frederica, Christ Church and the Wesley Memorial and Gardens.